News story: Government publishes landmark domestic abuse bill

first_imgThe landmark draft Domestic Abuse Bill has been published today (Monday 21 January), aimed at supporting victims and their families and pursuing offenders. It comes as it is revealed the estimated cost for domestic abuse victims in the year ending March 2017 in England and Wales was £66billion..To help tackle the crime, new legislation will: to address coercive control and economic abuse, and how domestic abuse affects children to transform the response in the justice system Domestic abuse destroys lives and warrants some of the strongest measures at our disposal to deter offenders and protect victims. That is why we are barring abusers from cross-examining their victims in the family courts – a practice which can cause immense distress and amount to a continuation of abuse – and giving courts greater powers, including new protection orders, to tackle this hideous crime. By pursuing every option available, to better support victims and bring more offenders to justice, we are driving the change necessary to ensure families never have to endure the pain of domestic abuse in silence. I have heard absolutely heartbreaking accounts of victims whose lives have been ripped apart because of physical, emotional or economic abuse they have suffered by someone close to them. The draft Domestic Abuse Bill recognises the complex nature of these horrific crimes and puts the needs of victims and their families at the forefront. This government is absolutely committed to shining a light on domestic abuse to ensure this hidden crime does not remain in the shadows. It is estimated that around two million adults experience domestic abuse each year, affecting almost 6% of all adults. Women are twice as likely to be victims than men.The draft bill will introduce measures: introduce the first ever statutory government definition of domestic abuse to specifically include economic abuse and controlling and manipulative non-physical abuse – this will enable everyone, including victims themselves, to understand what constitutes abuse and will encourage more victims to come forward establish a Domestic Abuse Commissioner to drive the response to domestic abuse issues introduce new Domestic Abuse Protection Notices and Domestic Abuse Protection Orders to further protect victims and place restrictions on the actions of offenders prohibit the cross-examination of victims by their abusers in the family courts provide automatic eligibility for special measures to support more victims to give evidence in the criminal courts The bill will also ban the distressing practice of domestic abuse victims being cross-examined by perpetrators in the family courts.Home Secretary Sajid Javid said: Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of Women’s Aid, said: Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs, Director of Surviving Economic Abuse said: Justice Secretary David Gauke said: Between the draft bill and its consultation response, the government is making 120 commitments to tackle domestic abuse. Amongst these are a series of non-legislative measures which include:center_img Refuge welcomes the draft bill announced by the government today. Refuge staff deal with the human misery of domestic violence every day. The cost to women and children’s lives is devastating. But now the immense cost to the taxpayer has been laid bare, too. Domestic violence is truly everybody’s business. This bill represents a once in a generation opportunity to address domestic violence; but in order to do so, we must ensure its aspirations are matched by adequate resource. We will continue to work closely with the government to ensure the final bill meets the needs of the women and children we support. Sandra Horley CBE, Chief Executive of Refuge, said: £8 million of Home Office funding to support children affected by domestic abuse a new crisis support system for those with no recourse to public funds additional funding and capacity building for services for disabled, elderly and LGTB victims updated support, training and guidance on economic abuse new and additional training for job centre work coaches, police, social workers and probation staff to help them recognise and effectively tackle abuse improved support for victims in the family court additional £500,000 funding for provisions for male victims Domestic abuse shatters lives and tears families apart. It can happen anywhere, to anyone. Protecting victims, as well as supporting survivors, is at the heart of our strengthened response to this horrific crime. Our draft Domestic Abuse Bill and wider package of measures, unveiled today, will bolster the protection for victims and will help expose and bring the vile abusers to justice. Economic abuse can prevent victims from leaving an abuser and thwart their efforts to rebuild their lives safely – it can even create new risks. Through committing to ensure that practitioners have access to training and guidance on economic abuse, the government has recognised that physical and economic safety are entwined. These new measures will help bring economic abuse out of the shadows and will transform responses, ensuring that victim-survivors are able to access the support they so desperately need. Domestic abuse costs lives and it costs money. It is happening at epidemic levels yet it has been largely hidden behind closed doors. Now is the time to bring it out into the spotlight and address the impact of domestic abuse properly once and for all. The Domestic Abuse Bill has the potential to create a step change in the national response and this must be backed up with sustainable funding for our life-saving network of specialist support services to make a real difference to survivors’ lives. We look forward to working with the government, our member services and survivors themselves to make sure survivors have the resources and support they need, as well as address the root causes of domestic abuse so that every woman and child can live free from fear and abuse. The Home Office has published a report into the economic and social cost of domestic abuse, which reveals the crime for victims in England and Wales cost an estimated £66 billion in the year ending March 2017.According to the research, the vast majority of this cost (£47 billion) was a result of the physical and emotional harm of domestic abuse, however it also includes other factors such as cost to health services (£2.3 billion), police (£1.3 billion) and victim services (£724 million).Minister for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability, Victoria Atkins said: Suzanne Jacob OBE, Chief Executive of SafeLives, said: We welcome the government’s set of proposals, particularly putting a greater focus on perpetrator accountability, both through the legal system, civil powers, and programmes that seek to change abusive behaviour. The government estimates today that perpetrators cost the economy £66 billion – more than the cost of alcohol and drug misuse, cigarettes and obesity combined. It affects more than 2 million people every year. For too long, we’ve expected victims and children to uproot their lives while the perpetrators remain invisible and unchallenged by the system. The new change in approach reflects what hundreds of survivors told SafeLives they wanted – we’re pleased the government is listening.last_img read more

MBA Projects Purchase Lending Growth in 2013 as Refinances Slide

first_img October 24, 2012 447 Views Mortgage origination is doing even better in 2012 than the “”Mortgage Bankers Association””:http://www.mbaa.org/default.htm (MBA) had anticipated, according to data from the trade group.[IMAGE]The association revised its estimate of originations for 2012 upward to $1.7 trillion. The revision is nearly half a trillion dollars above MBA’s $1.3 trillion projection in May this year.Growth is expected to fall off somewhat in 2013, with MBA forecasting $1.3 trillion in mortgage originations for the year, largely driven by “”a spillover of refinances into the first half of the year.””””We expected 2012 originations to be front-loaded in the first half of the year, with refis falling off with rate increases. Instead we saw the refinance market grow during the year due to a combination of low rates, thanks to QE3 and slowing global growth because of continuing problems in Europe, and adjustments in the HARP and FHA refinance programs,”” said MBA chief economist Jay Brinkmann. “”We expect 2013 refinance originations to play out like our original expectations for 2012, with a long tail of refis extending through the first half of the year followed by a rapid drop-off in the second half.””Purchase originations are projected to see more activity in 2013, climbing each quarter up to $585 billion from MBA’s revised 2012 estimate of $503 billion. On the other hand, refinance activity is expected to fall to $785 billion next year, down from this year’s revised $1.2 trillion.””The increase in purchase volumes will be driven by continued modest growth in the economy, an increase in [COLUMN_BREAK]owner-occupied sales financed with mortgages as opposed to cash purchases by investors, an increase in new home sales and a small increase in average home prices,”” Brinkmann explained.This, of course, assumes that the regulatory environment does not disrupt credit lending and that lending conditions don’t tighten further.Brinkmann also said the association expects mortgage rates to stay below 4 percent through the middle of next year, mostly do to the Federal Reserve’s commitments to keep them down. Based on MBA’s originations estimate, the Fed will be buying 36 percent of all mortgages originated in 2013. With originations projected to be front-loaded in the first half of the year, the Fed’s purchases in the second half alone may approach half of all mortgages originated in that time.In other economic forecasts, gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to grow, rising 2.0 percent in 2013 versus 1.6 percent in 2012. Brinkmann cited recent increases in residential fixed investment, echoing Freddie Mac’s forecast earlier in the week.According to MBA’s outlook, the employment rate will hover around 8 percent until the middle of 2013 before falling to 7.8 percent by the end of the year. Employment growth is unlikely to have a major effect on housing, as “”the broader measures of unemployment that are most predictive of the demand for housing are likely to remain stubbornly high.””There are several threats to the economy that may throw off these predictions, Brinkmann said, including ongoing economic slowdown in Europe, the slowdown in China’s growth that may impact neighboring economies, and the prospect of a war involving Iran and Israel that may disrupt the region and impact oil prices. The most immediate threat, however, is the approaching “”fiscal cliff”” that brings with it large tax increases and spending cuts.””The tax in particular would be devastating to economic growth,”” Brinkmann said. “”We believe that the entire package of tax increases and spending cuts, if left unaltered, would cut 3.5 to 4 percentage points from our growth forecast.”” Agents & Brokers Attorneys & Title Companies GDP Investors Lenders & Servicers Mortgage Applications Mortgage Bankers Association Mortgage Rates Service Providers Unemployment 2012-10-24 Tory Barringer in Data, Originationcenter_img Share MBA Projects Purchase Lending Growth in 2013 as Refinances Slidelast_img read more

New study shows how Ethiopia has managed to achieve extraordinary progress

first_img Source:https://www.berlin-institut.org/en/publications/studies-in-english/from-land-of-famine-to-land-of-hope Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 21 2018Ethiopia is one of the world’s least developed states. Yet for the past two decades the country has been making extraordinary progress. Targeted investment in health, education and employment has improved the standard of living and triggered a rapid decline in the fertility rate. If it succeeds in consolidating these achievements, Ethiopia could become one of the first sub-Saharan countries to benefit from the “demographic dividend” and demonstrate how development can work in Africa. A new study by the Berlin Institute shows how the country has already managed to come such a long way and which challenges remain to be overcome if it is to serve as a model country on the African continent. By African standards, Ethiopia is already doing well. With the second-largest population in Africa, it is one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. Together with assistance from abroad, the government’s long-term development plans have already improved the lives of many people and more than halved the share of the population living in poverty. Through the expansion of the health system, child mortality has decreased. The rate of school enrolment has more than doubled thanks to increased investment in education of up to 30 percent of national budget expenditure. In less than 20 years, the number of schools has risen by a factor of 25. Grain yields have more than doubled since 1990. At the same time, Ethiopia is increasingly becoming a target country for foreign investors, whose financial commitment should help to create jobs for the growing population.Development progress to date has also ushered in another positive trend. The fertility rate is falling rapidly, putting a brake on population growth and changing the country’s age structure. Because women are having fewer children, the population of working age has been growing faster than the population as a whole since the early 2000s. Ethiopia is thus heading for a “demographic bonus”, which in many other countries worldwide has paved the way to more growth and prosperity. Given the right framework conditions, this bonus could be transformed into a demographically determined spur to development. Like the Asian tiger states before it, Ethiopia could benefit from its demographic dividend provided it manages to consolidate its progress to date.Related StoriesResearchers evaluate usefulness of fertility appsStress during early pregnancy may reduce future fertility of offspringAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaDespite all its achievements, the country still faces enormous challenges. The development process has been marked by ethnic tensions and ruthlessly driven forward, often with little regard for human rights. The expansion of basic infrastructure has barely been able to keep up with population growth, and the number of people of working age is still growing faster than the number of jobs. Hopes are now pinned on the young prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, to introduce the necessary reforms and measures with which to overcome these challenges.The hoped-for further progress is unlikely to happen without international assistance. Ethiopia is depending on foreign help to achieve its goals. Were the engine of development to stall, there would be far-reaching consequences. “If Ethiopia fails, the stability of the entire region in the Horn of Africa will be endangered,” says Reiner Klingholz, director of the Berlin Institute for Population and Development. Flight and explusions would be inevitable. The European Union should therefore give Ethiopia as much financial support and advice as possible so that the country can break out of the vicious circle of poverty and rapid population growth, the study concludes.The study was financed by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) with funds from the Austrian Development Cooperation as well as by the DEG (Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft) and the GfK Verein. You can download the study free of charge as a PDF under:last_img read more