Governor Wolf Announces 60,000 Additional Naloxone Kits Available for First Responders Statewide

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces 60,000 Additional Naloxone Kits Available for First Responders Statewide October 20, 2017 Press Release,  Public Safety,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf and first responders gathered in Homewood at Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire Station #17 to thank first responders and announce the increased availability of live-saving Naloxone to first responders and law enforcement across the state. The funding, available through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, is being used to purchase approximately 60,000 Naloxone kits.“Naloxone is an incredibly important and lifesaving tool because we cannot get our loved ones, our neighbors, the members of our communities the treatment they need if they die from an overdose of prescription opioids or heroin,” Gov. Wolf said.“Every day, our first responders are saving the lives of Pennsylvanians by administering naloxone and reversing deadly overdoses. Those first responders have already reversed over 3,900 opioid overdoses since 2014. We need to support them in this effort and that’s why this funding from my 2017-18 budget is so critical.”“The range of first responders eligible for naloxone use is much broader than those folks we commonly think of as first responders, such as law enforcement and firemen,” PCCD Chairman Charles Ramsey said. “Individuals who find themselves in positions of being the first person able to respond to an overdose – such as librarians, public transit drivers, and drug treatment providers – are also eligible for the naloxone made available through this state funding.”NARCAN®(naloxone HCI) Nasal Spray is needle-free and does not require assembly. It’s designed for ease of use for nonmedical personnel.  Each kit includes two, 4-milligram doses and will be available to all 67 counties over a two-year period using $5 million in state funding. The kits are supplied by Adapt Pharma.“As a proud Pennsylvania company based in Radnor, we are honored to partner with the commonwealth to increase awareness of and access to NARCAN® Nasal Spray, the only FDA-approved, needle-free formulation of 4-milligram naloxone that does not require assembly or any specialized medical training,” Thomas Duddy, Adapt Pharma Executive Director, Communications said.In addition to Adapt Pharma and first responders, Gov. Wolf was joined by Senator Jay Costa and Representative Ed Gainey, Democratic chairs of the HOPE caucus, a group of state legislators committed to ensuring every Pennsylvanian has access to high quality prevention and treatment of the disease of substance use disorder; Derin Myers, Executive Deputy Secretary of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency; Jennifer Smith, Acting Secretary for the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs; Dr. Karen Hacker, Allegheny County Department of Health; Wendell Hissrich, Director of Public Safety for the city of Pittsburgh; and Darryl Jones, Chief, Bureau of Fire.The Wolf Administration’s Physician General and Acting Secretary for the Department of Health Dr. Rachel Levine issued a standing order for naloxone in October 2015.In addition, the Gov. Wolf and state agencies have been increasing efforts in the heroin and opioid epidemic fight in multiple additional areas, including numerous programs and initiatives:Working with the legislature to establish a new law limiting the number of opioids that can be prescribed to a minor and to individuals discharged from emergency rooms to seven days;Strengthening the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) through the legislative process so that doctors are required and able to check the system each time they prescribe opioids and benzodiazepines. To date, there have been more than 12 million patient searches made on the system;Forming new prescribing guidelines to help doctors who provide opioid prescriptions to their patients, including guidelines specific to orthopedics and sports medicine;Creating the warm handoff guideline to facilitate referrals from the emergency department to substance abuse treatment;Teaming with the legislature to establish education curriculum on safe prescribing for medical schools;Educating and encouraging patients to properly use, store and dispose of unused prescription medications through drug take-back initiatives, and expanding the number of drug take-back locations to nearly 700.For more information on the standing order for naloxone, visit the Department of Health’s website. For more information about the naloxone application process, visit the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency’s website.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Homebuyers revert to ‘closed plan’ design as privacy is back in vogue

first_img >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< Deb Fitzgerald at her new home in Raby Bay. She moved a few doors down to take advantage of a closed plan layout. IMAGE: Tara Croser.Home buyers are losing interest in what was the ever-popular open plan design as they start to remember, or realise, the benefits of a more closed layout. Eight of the best time warp homes Interior stylist Emma Blomfield says it is easier to style a closed floorplan. IMAGE: SuppliedInterior stylist Emma Blomfield said it was easier to style these spaces as well.“Styling a closed floor plan is a little easier than an open plan space as you have walls dictating where you place furniture and how big you can go with the size of your sofa, armchairs and dining tables,” Ms Blomfield said.“A closed space dining room generally only offers one layout for the table making it easy to work out where to place everything and what size/shape dining table to purchase. Staying together is better RELATED: Ms Carroll said the demand was so great that she found it harder to sell new homes with an open plan design, versus those built in the 1990s and prior.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours ago“Homes that have been built in the last five to 10 years, the more open plan ones, I find them harder move,” she said.“The older more traditional style … for families that are in that mode where they’ve got teenagers or teens, they’re just looking for that sense of privacy as well as having that space for everyone to enjoy together.”When it comes to building new, Burbank national general manager residential Louis Sultan said they were starting to see more demand for a separate living space that could be closed off.“We have seen an increase in homebuyers wanting a separate living space that can be closed off from the main living area, providing a place to relax,” Mr Sultan said.“The desire for a socially engaged family lifestyle has led to demand for alfresco spaces that can be used for dining and entertaining so now almost every home we offer now includes an alfresco area as a standard offering.” MORE: Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:51Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:51 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenStarting your hunt for a dream home00:51 Golden oldie lands suburb’s biggest 2019 sale “The same goes for a closed space lounge room, one wall is for the TV, another is for the sofa to go against and then you work within the rest of the space.” Waterline Real Estate principal Christine Carroll said buyers were concerned with mounting heating and cooling costs, noise and the lack of privacy — especially for families with teenagers.“Only this week I’ve been taking a gentleman through homes and his biggest problem is finding a house that will have the media room, separate lounge, somewhere for a gym, somewhere for his teenagers to hang out when they come and stay and also an open space to entertain in,” Ms Carroll said.“Our own home is one of those homes that’s open plan and one of our biggest issues was heating and cooling.“When we bought it we felt that it was a nice design and we could do things with it, but after living in it we’ve actually had to add on to provide us with that extra separation that we really couldn’t achieve.” Deb Fitzgerald is looking forward to the privacy her closed plan layout will give her and her grandchildren. IMAGE: Tara Croser.Archicentre Australia director Peter Georgiev said open planned living came about as a counter to the bygone era approach of closeting the kitchen from social activities.“This developed further in the 1990s to extend transparency between kitchen, living and outdoor areas, say a deck or terrace, to the other cooking zone — the barbecue area,” Mr Georgiev said.“Along with opening up come potential disadvantages, so architectural tailoring of design needs to take into account some balance, use of wing walls or giving spatial definition to alcoves or vaulted ceilings.”For homeowner Deb Fitzgerald, the need to convert from open plan to closed plan was so great, she sold and moved few doors up on the same street.“We have grandchildren now, and when they come … they’re watching things on television that you don’t want to watch and they want space, that makes thing a bit difficult,: Mrs Fitzgerald said.“Also the fact that we do have grown up children coming to visit, having a separate space can make that a little bit easier.”last_img read more