Nimbus Dance Performs at NJPAC with NJ Symphony Orchestra

first_img ×  1 / 3  Photo of Nimbus Dance by Megan Maloy  2 / 3    3 / 3  ❮ ❯ Where “Patch of Turf” boils with the earthbound immediacy of biology, evolution, and survival, “Falling Sky,” a full company work for eight dancers, conjures the lofty, spiritual realm of the skies, addressing the intangible implications of a changing climate and natural world to our psyche and consciousness.Award-winning video artists Laia Cabrera and Isabelle Duverger add projected scenic design to “Falling Sky.” Chamber musicians from the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra perform Qasim Naqvi’s scores live for both works, creating an intensely vivid theatrical experience.Also performed at NJPAC will be the return of Dawn Marie Bazemore’s “The After Party,” homage to jazz legends Nina Simone and Nancy Wilson. With vibrant, quick, and spirited choreography and intricate musicality, this crowd-pleasing ode to jazz explores intertwined relationships, dynamics, and joy of movement. Mr. Pott’s “The Glare From These Horizons” will also be performed.Tickets for the evening are available at www.njpac.org/events/detail/nimbus-dance-2019. 1 / 3  Photo of Nimbus Dance by Megan Maloy  2 / 3    3 / 3  ❮ ❯center_img Nimbus Dance returns to the New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC) on November 14 at 7 PM, accompanied by musicians from the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO) in a collaboration that brings together the two acclaimed New Jersey non-profit arts groups. The evening features Nimbus’ world premiere of “Falling Sky,” choreographed by Artistic Director Samuel Pott.“Falling Sky” includes new music commissioned by internationally-recognized composer Qasim Naqvi. The work is performed alongside Mr. Pott’s seminal 2015 dance, “Patch of Turf,” in which a tour-de-force quartet of female dancers manipulate a 12’ x 8’ piece of artificial grass, poignantly revealing both our estrangement from the natural world and insatiable appetite for its resources.last_img read more

Kate Hawkesby: Cannabis referendum – be careful about what and who you are voting for

first_imgNZ Herald 18 July 2019Family First Comment: Well said by Kate Hawkesby..“…But the real danger with decriminalisation is what happens to cannabis production in terms of psychoactive properties. Colorado’s experience is that there’s a spike in these – and that in turn has a dramatic impact on mental health problems.”#saynopetodopeVoteNO.nzI see a secondary school headmaster is the latest to come out swinging against the cannabis referendum.Kieran Fouhy, from St Paul’s College in Ponsonby, believes legalising cannabis when New Zealand already has an issue with alcohol is just asking for trouble. He thinks young people already have enough to contend with.His main concern is younger people won’t respect the age restrictions, they’ll simply access cannabis from older friends.He said: “When you legalise it, you normalise it.”And he doesn’t buy into the Government’s line that it’s a health issue, or that decriminalising it will take it out of the hands of gangs.And I agree, it won’t.I spoke to Colorado’s executive director of the National Drug and Alcohol Screening Association, Jo McGuire, a couple of months ago and asked her about whether legalisation had shut down the black market there. She said it didn’t – in fact it exploded it.And the thing about black market cannabis is that it’s higher in THC.Since legalisation there, and bear in mind they are years into this experiment, there’s been a sharp increase in the black market and one of the reasons is personal cultivation in people’s own homes.On top of that, you’ve got the regulatory market struggling to control limits on production, so they over-produce – which also feeds the black market.So not only do people bypass the rules anyway, but you also have other people coming in and monetising the excess. Hence you get a thriving black market, irrespective of regulation.Tax-wise, Colorado’s experience is that for every tax dollar that comes in, they’re spending $4.50.Youth use has increased. One in four employees self-report that they go to work stoned.In essence, Colorado’s still waiting to see any benefits from legalisation, McGuire said.https://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12250487&ref=twitter  (behind paywall)Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Close pal Toure urges Liverpool ace to grab Real Madrid, Barca chance

first_imgA close friend of Sadio Mane says the Liverpool striker needs to consider a move to Barcelona or Real Madrid. Liverpool forward Sadio Mane Mady Toure established Generation Foot in Senegal back in 2000 with the aim of developing the raw talents that presented themselves in the region. In the 20 years since its birth, it has produced more than 10 international players, including Reds frontman Mane. The pair are believed to have remained close since those days.Advertisement Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?8 Best 1980s High Tech Gadgets6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesTop 10 Enemies Turned Friends in TVBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?This Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hysterical Loading… center_img And Toure told the Guardian: “The fact Sadio has won the African Ballon d’Or will spur him on to win the European one too. “That’s his objective. Sadio always told me he would become one of the best players in the world. He said that to me and now he is among them but he has to leave  Liverpool now Read Also:Mane leads Liverpool quintet in UEFA Fans’ Team of the Year nominees “It’s his last year and he has to leave Liverpool when it’s up to go to Barcelona or Real Madrid.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Jim Boeheim addresses his role in failing to follow Syracuse’s own drug policy

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 19, 2015 at 2:22 pm Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_ The NCAA cited Syracuse University for failing to follow its own drug policy. And while the NCAA doesn’t have its own policy and doesn’t force universities to have their own, it does require that they follow them if they have them.SU did not, allowing players to practice and play after one or more failed drug tests, contrary to the school’s policy, according to the NCAA report. Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim was personally responsible for not calling parents after players failed drug tests, as SU’s policy stated he was supposed to, according to the NCAA report. On Thursday, Boeheim took responsibility for the violations but said he didn’t craft or administer the policy and that he didn’t know that not following the school’s own policy was equivalent to an NCAA violation.“I had one part,” he said when asked how he differentiated between administering the policy and failing to call parents. “I didn’t administer who played or who couldn’t play or who practiced or who couldn’t practice. The drug policy, and I took responsibility for that and I do now, no one knew that if you have a policy and you don’t follow it exactly step by step, it’s the same as violating an NCAA rule. No coach in the country would have known that.”Boeheim said not calling parents was a matter of trust. He said four players were one-time offenders that never tested positive again after he told them he would tell their parents the next time.The head coach also said there were some instances where calling parents would not have been helpful.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU’s drug policy was implemented in 2000 and remained largely unchanged until 2009, according to the NCAA report. That original policy stated that first offenders would be ineligible until Boeheim spoke with their parents, second offenders would be removed from the team until a counselor told the team doctor the player was no longer using the substance and third offenders would ineligible and have their financial aid withdrawn at the end of the semester, according to the NCAA report.A 2004 amendment added a one-time grace period after the third offense and a 2008 change allowed Daryl Gross to intervene if he thought the grace period wasn’t long enough.Gross knew Boeheim wasn’t calling parents, Boeheim said. The SU head coach also said the positive tests were only for one substance. He pointed out that in daily compliance meetings he was never told about the strictness of the NCAA rules on team’s following their own drug policies.“To me the crucial part of the drug testing program is do you let someone practice or play when they shouldn’t have,” he said. “I never made that call. I was told what to do. If I’m told not to do something, that, a press conference, I don’t do it. Because I work for people.” Commentslast_img read more