Minister Grange Proposes Caribbean Women’s T20 Cricket League

first_img Meanwhile, Ms. Grange made an impassioned plea for a collaborative effort to revive test cricket in the West Indies, noting that the game was in need of urgent attention regionally Story Highlights Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, has proposed the creation of a Twenty20 (T20) cricket tournament for women in the region, similar to the format played by their male counterparts in the Caribbean Premier League (CPL).    “This is my challenge to you. It’s time to expand access and opportunities for women in cricket in our region,” the Minister emphasized. Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, has proposed the creation of a Twenty20 (T20) cricket tournament for women in the region, similar to the format played by their male counterparts in the Caribbean Premier League (CPL).She said the region’s women cricketers would benefit significantly from the exposure and experience to be gained against the background of a global viewership of more than 130 million for the CPL, which is contested by six franchise teams.The Minister was speaking at a breakfast meeting with members of defending CPL champions, Jamaica Tallawahs, as well as organisers and sponsors of the tournament at the Melbourne Cricket Club in Kingston on Thursday, August 24.Ms. Grange noted that the CPL sponsors were pleased and encouraged by the fact that the CPL, which started in 2013, provides the region’s young male cricketers, in particular, with the opportunity to advance their careers.She said in light of this, the organisers should give consideration to providing a similar platform to enable the Caribbean’s young women cricketers to do likewise, both regionally and internationally.“This is my challenge to you. It’s time to expand access and opportunities for women in cricket in our region,” the Minister emphasized.She also congratulated the Tallawahs for being the only team to win the CPL twice, and for positioning themselves to secure a third hold on the title this year.Meanwhile, Ms. Grange made an impassioned plea for a collaborative effort to revive test cricket in the West Indies, noting that the game was in need of urgent attention regionallyIn this regard, the Minister proposed that all stakeholders, including administrators, players, governments and journalists, form a coalition to chart a course aimed at returning the West Indies to the pinnacle of the five-day format of the sport globally.“All interested parties have to knock heads to bring about the change we need. I give my commitment that I am ready to be part of the coming together in search of (a solution to revive test cricket in the) West Indies. We owe it to the people of the Caribbean and the rest of the world who have experienced the pleasures of cricket by watching the West Indies,” Ms. Grange said.last_img read more

Alberta students walk out to protest expected gaystraight alliance changes

first_imgCALGARY — Students across Alberta walked out of their classes today to protest expected changes to the province’s rules for gay-straight alliances.  The school clubs are meant to be a safe space for LGBTQ students, and prevent bullying and harassment.Throngs of teenagers spilled out onto the sidewalk outside Western Canada High School in Calgary, where they chanted and held colourful signs.Cars and trucks along a busy thoroughfare near downtown honked and a cluster of adults stood nearby cheering and holding signs in support.Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said during the election campaign his United Conservative government would replace the NDP-drafted education law with older unproclaimed legislation.That would have the effect of undoing several GSA provisions, including a ban on schools informing parents if their children join such a club.“Teachers are people that we’re supposed to trust and they’re people that we should be comfortable telling about everything that we’re going through,” said Aimee, a Grade 10 student who organized the walkout.She declined to give her last name because she was concerned about online harassment.“I think that if teachers are the ones telling parents, then that is the most impersonal way to come out. Not only is it not safe for everyone, but it also should be up to the individual themselves to decide when.”The Canadian Presslast_img read more