Decision time for Bishop Murray

first_imgTwitter Print BISHOP of Limerick, Dr Donal Murray, is under increased pressure to resign following comments made by the Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin that he is not happy with the response of bishops named in The Murphy Report into clerical child sex abuse.Bishop Murray is to make a decision on his position in the next two weeks.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Should he decide to stand down, it could mean a fresh wave of new appointments throughout the diocese.Speaking on RTE’s Primetime, Archbishop Murray said bishops named in the report had a responsibility to the archdiocese of Dublin, where the abuse took place, and should not be seeking answers from members of their own dioceses, and would be writing to the bishops to this effect.He added that he would, if in that position, personally prefer to come forward, rather than be “hunted or pushed” to give answers.“I can’t ask my priests to stand in front of congregations unless they have answers that they genuinely feel they can stand over. It’s not enough to say that it is a matter for dioceses where they are now”.Bishop Murray, who recently vacated the former bishop’s residence on the North Circular Road, and purchased a property in Annacotty, is named in the report for handling badly a number of complaints and suspicions against priests in the Dublin archdiocese, where he served from 1982 to 1996.During the interview on Tuesday, Archbishop Martin said that he would not be willing to sit at meetings with people who had not responded to a very serious situation.Given the planned meeting of the hierarchy next Wednesday and Thursday, it seems that he is seeking clarification and responses before then.This comes after a meeting of 80 members of the Limerick diocese – 65 priests and 15 lay people – issued a statement in support of the Bishop Murray, saying: “We believe it would be a retrograde step for the continuing development of safeguarding children, in our diocese and society, for our bishop to resign”.The wife and daughter of Peter McCloskey, an abuse victim who took his own life in 2006, have also come out in support of Bishop MurraySpeaking on Morning Ireland, Peter’s wife, Kathy, and daughter, Amy, said the bishop should not resign and that he had been a huge support to them, and was a “very kind and humane man”.A radio vox in the city showed the majority favoured the bishop stepping down.In response to the Archbishop’s comments, Bishop Murray, who replaced Jeremiah Newman in Limerick in 1996, said he was not looking to save his position, but “had merely entered into a process of engagement with the people and priests of his diocese as to whether his ministry is a hindrance or help to the diocese”.Speaking on Morning Ireland, Peter’s wife, Kathy, and daughter, Amy, said the bishop should not resign and that he had been a huge support to them, and was a “very kind and humane man”.A radio vox in the city showed the majority favoured the bishop stepping down.In response to the Archbishop’s comments, Bishop Murray, who replaced Jeremiah Newman in Limerick in 1996, said he was not looking to save his position, but “had merely entered into a process of engagement with the people and priests of his diocese as to whether his ministry is a hindrance or help to the diocese”. Linkedin NewsLocal NewsDecision time for Bishop MurrayBy admin – December 3, 2009 571 Advertisementcenter_img WhatsApp Email Facebook Previous articleDenis leaves a legacy of restorationNext articleArts news in brief adminlast_img read more

Kissing Bugs

first_imgOver the last few weeks, many Georgians have focused their attention on the media-hyped coverage of the kissing bug. Much of the sensationalism and worry surrounding this insect boogieman is unwarranted, according to University of Georgia entomologists. While the bug is native to Georgia, it made headlines recently because it is known to carry the parasite that causes Chagas disease, which sickens millions of people in Mexico and South America every year, according to the World Health Organization. While the disease is devastating in the countries that it affects, it is extremely rare in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Kissing bugs have been in Georgia for millions of years,” said Nancy Hinkle, UGA Extension veterinary and medical entomologist. “Kissing bugs are not deadly and most of them are not infected with the parasite that causes Chagas disease … The Chagas disease parasite is transmitted only through the feces of specific kissing bugs.” There are at least 11 different species of kissing bugs in the South, and they vary in appearance, Hinkle said. Still, many Georgians are worried when they find a kissing bug, or its harmless cousin, the wheel bug, in or around their homes. UGA Extension agents and entomologists frequently receive specimens from Georgians who are worried about finding kissing bugs in their homes. Most of the specimens have been the more common wheel bug, said Dan Suiter, UGA Extension entomologist and invasive insect expert. Tannish-brown wheel bugs can be recognized by a ridge of horn-like spikes, looking like a cogwheel, down the centers of their backs. Some kissing bugs are also tannish-brown, but are generally flatter and have a black and tan striped border around their bodies. The relatively unknown wheel bug is actually more likely to bite Georgians than its headline-making cousin. Still, these cases of mistaken identity and fears of Chagas disease have people worried, but they shouldn’t be, Hinkle said. With freezing temperatures ahead, most kissing bugs will be going in hibernation soon. There is no risk of catching Chagas disease from the bite of a kissing bug. The parasite that causes Chagas disease is carried in the bug’s feces. In other words, being bitten by the bug will not harm you, but rubbing the bug’s excrement in your eyes or into an open wound might make you sick. You are at more risk of contracting the disease if you clean up raccoon, opossum, skunk or armadillo nests; that’s where the bugs live and where kissing bug feces are most concentrated. There’s not much risk if the nests of wild animals are avoided. Georgians can keep kissing bugs out of their homes the same way they can deter other insects. Turn off porch lights at night to avoid attracting the bugs. Seal around doors and windows with weather-stripping and replace door sweeps; if cold air can’t get in, neither can kissing bugs. In the U.S., we are more likely to die in an automobile accident than to ever, in our whole lives, get infected with Chagas disease. For more information about Chagas disease and kissing bugs in the U.S., contact your local Extension office by visiting extension.uga.edu or calling 1-800-ASK-UGA1.center_img Here are some facts about kissing bugs and Chagas disease in Georgia: last_img read more