Fall in Australian coal prices raises concerns about economics of Adani’s proposed Carmichael mine

first_imgFall in Australian coal prices raises concerns about economics of Adani’s proposed Carmichael mine FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:A crash in Australian thermal coal prices is raising fresh questions about the viability of a controversial $4 billion coal mine just a week ahead of a national election in which climate change is a key issue.Final approval of the Carmichael coal mine in Queensland, owned by India’s Adani Enterprises, should come in “a matter of weeks, not months” following nearly a decade on the drawing board, the company’s mining chief executive, Lucas Dow, told Reuters last month.But a 40 percent slump in benchmark Australian thermal coal prices since mid-2018 to a two-year low last month, points to tight profit margins and questions as to whether the economics will support the launch of the mine as soon as next year.Adani has said it is aiming to start producing 10 million tonnes a year of coal from March 2020, but analysts say the target date is optimistic.“I think a lot of people are doubting as to whether it will see the light of day,” said Wood Mackenzie analyst Victor Tanevski in Sydney. Tanevski suggests benchmark Newcastle 6,000 grade coal would need to be close to $100 a tonne for the mine to break even. The 6,000 benchmark was quoted at $86.20 on Thursday.Analysts suggest the mine is unlikely to start commercial production until the middle of the next decade at the soonest, if at all. A profit margin of $8-$12 a tonne is half the averages of 2017 and 2018, highlighting how rapidly the market has turned since the Paris agreement on climate change.More: In a sunset industry, economics of Adani’s Australian coal mine questionedlast_img read more

News alert: IEEFA annual conference 2019

first_imgNews alert: IEEFA annual conference 2019 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享IEEFA.org will be on hiatus during the week of June 17, for our annual Energy Finance Training in New York, bringing together energy and financial experts, advocates, and attorneys from across the globe. You can follow conference highlights on Twitter (@ieefa_institute #ieefa2019). Our daily and weekly news coverage and commentary will resume on June 24.last_img

Weekend Pick: Hike the New River Gorge Waterfalls

first_imgButcher Branch Falls. Photo: Ed RehbeinThere is one simple reason why spring is the hiking season: the weather. Does it get any more glorious than temperatures in the mid 60s, with crisp mornings and warm afternoons with the sun on your face? The summer humidity hasn’t moved in yet so the sky is as blue as it could possibly be, and the air as fresh as the wildflowers that are beginning to bloom. Yes, indeed, late April is the time to break out the hiking boots and hit the trail, and West Virginia’s New River Gorge is one of the best places to do just that.Truth be told, the New River Gorge is an outdoor recreation Mecca. Whitewater rafting and climbing are the main draw of the area, but there are ample opportunities to mountain bike, hike, cycle, and even B.A.S.E. jump if you go on the right weekend. The New River itself is also one of the best smallmouth bass fisheries in the mid-Atlantic and its tributaries hold trout year round. So when we say Mecca, that is not an exaggeration. Pretty much anything you could want to do in the outdoors, you can do at the New River Gorge. Not only that, you can do it at a very high level. But since we have already declared this hiking season, the New River Gorge is full of stunning waterfalls that are easily accessible.Tributaries of the New flow down the steep walls of the gorge, dropping hundreds of feet in a short distance; that equals waterfalls. Some of our favorites are Craig Branch Falls off the Kaymoor Miners Trail and the beautiful Middle Falls of Fern Creek, but there are more to choose from. Here is our guide to these hidden treasures of the Gorge, so take your pick. You will not be disappointed. Insider tip: stop in at Pints and Pies in Fayetteville following your hike for a pizza and beer to put a cap on a great day.View Larger Maplast_img read more

The Festy Experience at Infinity Downs Farm

first_imgIn the heart of Nelson County, VA, a new festival venue has been born. After four days of amazing music and weather at Lockn’ Festival, Infinity Downs Farm — a 387 acre property nestled at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains — has proven to be an unprecedented site for outdoor community gatherings. Infinity Downs will now turn to host to The 8th Annual Festy Experience– a family-friendly festival, which celebrates amazing music, craft beer, and the great outdoors.The Festy has just announced their daily lineup of artists and a weekend full of kids activities. Beyond 4 full days of world class performances, family fun is shaping up to be a centerpiece of this year’s Festy. Along with a family camping area, there will be the Little Planets Kids Zone, complete with a rockwall, children’s jams, magics shows, instrument making workshops, drumming & didgeridoo workshops, balloon animals & bubble making, and a kid’s Parade on Saturday! Check out TheFesty.com for full details and updated lists of activities. Weekend Camping and Daytripping tickets are on sale now. Single-day tickets are also available starting at $25 dollars. Visit TheFesty.com/Tickets. Every Friday in September, swing by any Walkabout Outfitter location for opportunities to win Festy Tickets, Walkabout Gear, and surprises from The North Face.last_img read more

Buenos Aires Moves to Lower Taxes on Audiovisual Industry

first_imgBy Dialogo July 15, 2010 Buenos Aires will move forward on a law to promote the development of the audiovisual industry by granting tax benefits to producers who locate in areas of the Argentine capital, city mayor Mauricio Macri announced. The bill to be submitted to the Buenos Aires legislature proposes that five areas of the city be designated as forming an “audiovisual district” in which television, film, advertising, animation, and videogame producers will receive tax exemptions for a ten- to fifteen-year period. Argentina is the fourth-largest global exporter of television content, selling its productions in eighty countries, according to the proposal put forward by Macri. In the capital, Buenos Aires, an average of seven hundred productions are filmed each year, principally advertising spots. Argentina’s audiovisual exports were valued at 419 million dollars in 2008, according to the most recent figures available, and the sector currently employs more than 51,000 people. “The city of Buenos Aires has a chance here to grow a very great deal (…) If we don’t generate and export more content, it’s going to be difficult for us in Argentina to be able to give everyone an opportunity,” Macri said upon introducing the proposal.last_img read more

Panama’s SENAN Seizes Large Amount of Cocaine

first_imgThe Naval Force of the Pacific has now seized 5.8 tons of cocaine in 2015, which would have generated more than $156 million (USD) for drug traffickers. The Navy is asking residents to use hotline 147 to report any suspicious activity while it continues to combat violence and the trafficking of illicit goods throughout Colombia’s Pacific region. Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN) recently captured three Colombians and seized about 996 kilograms of cocaine in support of Operation San José, a security initiative in Panamanian waters in the Pacific Ocean. Agents made the interdiction and arrests south of the Azuero Peninsula, where the suspects had allegedly tossed the cocaine overboard in an attempt to hide the evidence; law enforcement officers then turned the cocaine over to the Antidrug Prosecutor’s Office. Infantry Troops with the Task Force Against Drug Trafficking’s Poseidón Unit uncovered the cocaine along with 432 gallons of illegal fuel in the port city of Tumaco, the Navy reported on March 24. Meanwhile, Troops with the Marine Infantry Battalion No. 40 patrolling the area found a boat and are investigating if the vessel would have been used to transport the cocaine. Colombia’s National Navy seized 320 kilograms of cocaine that was hidden in an underground cove near the Pacific Coast in the Department of Nariño. Colombia’s National Navy seizes large volume of cocaine Since January 1, SENAN agents confiscated 3,768 kilograms of illegal drugs, including 3,595 kilograms of cocaine and 173 kilograms of marijuana. Panama is a key transshipment point for international drug traffickers; nearly 80 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Central America and Mexico, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board’s 2014 report. Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN) recently captured three Colombians and seized about 996 kilograms of cocaine in support of Operation San José, a security initiative in Panamanian waters in the Pacific Ocean. Agents made the interdiction and arrests south of the Azuero Peninsula, where the suspects had allegedly tossed the cocaine overboard in an attempt to hide the evidence; law enforcement officers then turned the cocaine over to the Antidrug Prosecutor’s Office. Infantry Troops with the Task Force Against Drug Trafficking’s Poseidón Unit uncovered the cocaine along with 432 gallons of illegal fuel in the port city of Tumaco, the Navy reported on March 24. Meanwhile, Troops with the Marine Infantry Battalion No. 40 patrolling the area found a boat and are investigating if the vessel would have been used to transport the cocaine. By Dialogo March 30, 2015 SENAN and the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) have served as two of Panama’s primary security forces since the government abolished the Military in 1990. Since January 1, SENAN agents confiscated 3,768 kilograms of illegal drugs, including 3,595 kilograms of cocaine and 173 kilograms of marijuana. Panama is a key transshipment point for international drug traffickers; nearly 80 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Central America and Mexico, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board’s 2014 report. The Navy is asking residents to use hotline 147 to report any suspicious activity while it continues to combat violence and the trafficking of illicit goods throughout Colombia’s Pacific region. Colombia’s National Navy seizes large volume of cocaine Colombia’s National Navy seized 320 kilograms of cocaine that was hidden in an underground cove near the Pacific Coast in the Department of Nariño. The Operational Research Criminal Group Criminal Poseidón tested and weighed the cocaine. The Navy didn’t immediately report which drug trafficking group is suspected of having owned the cocaine or whether Troops made any arrests. The Operational Research Criminal Group Criminal Poseidón tested and weighed the cocaine. The Navy didn’t immediately report which drug trafficking group is suspected of having owned the cocaine or whether Troops made any arrests. SENAN and the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) have served as two of Panama’s primary security forces since the government abolished the Military in 1990. The Naval Force of the Pacific has now seized 5.8 tons of cocaine in 2015, which would have generated more than $156 million (USD) for drug traffickers. last_img read more

IAAFA, Bridge of the Americas

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo April 09, 2018 The Inter-American Air Forces Academy (IAAFA) offers a unique environment. Students receive an education focused on technical, operational, and professional instruction, while at the same time creating lasting alliances and strengthening solidarity among the U.S. Air Force and the air and security forces of partner nations in Latin America, the Caribbean. U.S. Air Force Colonel Isaac Davidson, IAAFA commandant, is proud of the welcoming academic environment at the institution and works to continue to develop that environment. As commandant of the school since August 2017, he is responsible for military and technical education offered yearly (mostly in Spanish) to more than 900 students from government agencies and air forces of 21 Latin American and Caribbean countries. IAAFA opened its doors in 1943 at the Albrook Air Force Station in Panama at the request of then Peruvian Air Force General Fernando Melgar, then Minister of Aviation. It was the first regional academic institution of the air forces to offer its members a shared forum to learn, debate, and plan. Since then, the number of students continues to increase. IAAFA put on its finest to celebrate its 75th anniversary. Col. Davidson spoke with Diálogo during the anniversary celebrations, which took place March 12th–16th in San Antonio, Texas. Among other events were the Third Western Hemisphere Exchange Symposium, a gala dinner, a flag parade, and an athletic competition for students. Col. Davidson talked about the importance of the symposium, the institution’s 75 years, and the benefits it brings to air forces of the region. Diálogo: The Third Western Hemisphere Exchange Symposium focused on four topics: humanitarian aid and natural disaster response; operations against drug trafficking; air space command and control; and aircraft upkeep and maintenance. What is the importance of these topics within the framework of IAAFA’s 75th anniversary celebration? U.S. Air Force Colonel Isaac Davidson, IAAFA commandant: We have a very big challenge in the region, for example, humanitarian aid, natural disaster response, and aircraft upkeep and maintenance. These challenges are shared throughout the Americas. It’s important to know how to respond to a natural disaster as a country and as an air force, how to cooperate not only among armed forces, but also with civilian and non-governmental organizations, and how to work with neighboring countries. This symposium was to go over the lessons learned of the different countries that experienced natural disasters, such as the earthquakes in Haiti, Ecuador, and Mexico in 2010, 2016, and 2017. Today, IAAFA plays an important role in handling these issues. The school provides a physical space and structure to learn. It’s an academic institution, and that’s what we do. The challenges change, and IAAFA responds to those challenges and changes. The point is not to meet the challenge, but to exceed the challenge. Diálogo: What is the added value that IAAFA offers Latin American and Caribbean air forces as it turns 75? Col. Davidson: By law, IAAFA offers training and education to military members throughout the Americas. However, it also offers education to other countries that are eligible to receive funding from the U.S. Department of State. The added value is that IAAFA fosters lasting friendships that allow opportunities for cooperation to be created. The impact that IAAFA has had in the past 75 years has been fundamental, especially because its students have forged lasting friendships. As a result of these friendships, it generated cooperation on security matters to the benefit of all the countries involved—the United States and the Americas in general. For example, there have been emergencies in different countries on multiple occasions, and the graduates and/or students find out that the person they need to contact in the other country was a graduate and/or a student at the same time. This completely changes the dynamic of the aid process, which, at the end of the day, benefits the countries themselves. This happens quite often with members of IAAFA. I am only repeating the words of generals and chiefs of the air forces, many of them IAAFA graduates, who say that the institution allowed them to have these friendships, along with the training and education they acquired, which create benefits and allow them to cooperate with each other whenever necessary. Diálogo: What does it mean for you to be at the helm of IAAFA’s 75th anniversary celebration? Col. Davidson: It’s a privilege that I truly do not deserve, but an opportunity that God has given me. With that in mind, I am a public servant just like the other members of IAAFA, since we are a great team. I am a public servant, and it comes from the heart. This is an opportunity that I wouldn’t miss for the world. I didn’t ask to come to IAAFA. Someone in the military hierarchy decided that, and I am very happy to be here today. Diálogo: What are IAAFA’s plans in the medium and long term? Col. Davidson: In the medium term, we want to formally connect in an effort to set budgets for what IAAFA needs to support the objectives of U.S. Northern Command, U.S. Southern Command, and U.S. Central Command. We also want to train our instructors more so they can strengthen their capacities. In the long term, we want to dramatically transform the way we teach so that it becomes a continuous learning process that’s much more dynamic, interactive, and successful. Diálogo: What kinds of educational changes are you referring to? Col. Davidson: Imagine you’re in a large room that has two interactive electronic panels, students have an electronic tablet, and all these devices can project images from the Internet or from any media, play a video, add notes, etc. All these means of information work at the same time. In the future, our education will be more virtual and will have a combination of online classes, in-person classes, and distance learning, and it will be continuous education. Traditionally, education was formatted so that teaching and learning happened in the classroom, and the lesson would begin at a specific time and end after an hour or two of class. This new learning model will be more continuous. Students will learn what they want to learn, when they want to, and where they want to. In other words, a student’s education won’t end when the course is over and the student graduates. On the contary, the student will continue to have access to class material and new academic materials. Diálogo: IAAFA has international instructors from partner nations. How is that exchange done? Col. Davidson: Partner nations have the opportunity to have instructors be a part of IAAFA. It’s a process that begins through the U.S. Embassy with the Office of Security Cooperation. The application eventually goes to IAAFA to be evaluated and for a decision to be made. We received commissioned and non-commissioned officer instructors from various countries who usually participate in the institution for a period of two years. It’s very valuable to have international instructors because they contribute to the institution’s mission. Diálogo: What are the benefits of having U.S. Air Force students interacting with those of partner nation air forces? Col. Davidson: There are many benefits because this interaction that happens at IAAFA means that we learn from each other—we learn from our partner nations, and they also learn from us. Founded on lasting friendships, IAAFA is a bridge to the Americas, and, for the Americas, IAAFA represents a bridge to the United States. IAAFA has been a bridge these past 75 years, as it has been for international security in the region. Diálogo: What is your message to the other air forces in the region? Col. Davidson: IAAFA is here for them, for our partner nations in the region. IAAFA’s name itself is proof of that. It’s a school that belongs to the Americas; it is the Inter-American Air Forces Academy. In this way, we are part of IAAFA, and each of our partner nations is part of IAAFA. This academy belongs to us so that we can educate ourselves, build our skills, and foster these fundamental long-term friendships.last_img read more

Venezuelan Regime Attacks Military, Opposition Leaders

first_imgBy Gustavo Arias Retana/Diálogo Freelancer, Costa Rica June 21, 2019 Following Venezuelan Interim President Juan Guaidó’s efforts to restore constitutional order on April 30, 2019, Nicolás Maduro ordered 56 members of the Bolivarian Army expelled. The illegal regime also violated the parliamentary immunity of representatives, detained National Assembly Vice President Édgar Zambrano, and formally accused several opposition lawmakers of “high treason.” “The regime is evaluating the international community’s response to these detentions to decide whether or not to arrest Guaidó,” said Carlos Murillo, an international relations expert at the National University of Costa Rica. “This is a form of intimidation, because the regime is now desperate and will have to find a way out before the end of the year.” Maduro’s strategy could however influence other service members to turn their backs on the illegal government. “We must not forget the role of Venezuelan service members in narcotrafficking, which provides resources to the leadership. Those belonging to that circle are not willing to relinquish their positions, and be exposed to criminal groups’ reactions and lose money. Service members outside this leadership will probably [resign] as the situation in the country gets worse,” Murillo said. Expelled Among the expelled service members are Major General Cristopher Figuera, former director of the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service, and National Guard Lieutenant Colonel Ilich Sánchez, who used to lead the National Assembly’s security command. On May 9, Maj. Gen. Figuera appeared in a video condemning the regime’s abuses. Two days earlier, the United States removed sanctions previously imposed on him. Meanwhile, Lt. Col. Sánchez was the most visible military figure that accompanied Guaidó at the April 30 movement. Some of the expelled service members found refuge in embassies, including 25 soldiers who sought asylum at the Brazilian Embassy. As for opposition leaders, on May 10, the regime detained Zambrano — his whereabouts are still unknown. The U.S. Embassy in Caracas requested his immediate release. The regime also revoked the parliamentary immunity of 14 other representatives, some requested asylum at the Argentine, Italian, and Mexican embassies, while others are still underground.last_img read more

Paraguay Dismantles ‘VIP Marijuana’ Labs

first_imgBy Eduardo Szklarz/Diálogo November 25, 2020 In September, the Paraguayan National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD, in Spanish) dismantled four urban clandestine labs that produced so-called “VIP marijuana,” the most expensive variety in the market. This is a new marijuana strain with high levels of THC, the main psychoactive substance in cannabis.“The network produced marijuana strains with THC levels of 20 to 30 percent,” SENAD said in a press release on September 23. “Conventional marijuana, produced in the forests of border areas, has THC levels of 2 to 8 percent and is much more affordable.”The network operated with special systems for lighting, ventilation, insulation, and marijuana storage, then selling the product to customers with high purchasing power. (Photo: Paraguayan National Anti-Drug Secretariat)Agents carried out 12 raids in the cities of Asunción and Fernando de la Mora as part of Operation Gorilla Glue, named after a strong variety of marijuana.Eleven people were detained, designated by Paraguay’s Office of the Attorney General as financiers, producers, and distributors in the illicit business. “All of them are between 20 and 32 years old, with good purchasing power and agronomic knowledge,” SENAD indicated.Set up in urban housing, the labs had special systems with artificial lighting, ventilation, insulation, and marijuana storage. The equipment and seeds were purchased abroad.According to experts, what is known as “VIP marijuana” are hybrids made from the cannabis sativa variety.“[The producers] were crossbreeding all the marijuana sub-varieties, including indica, ruderalis, and sativa itself,” Ricardo Galeano, director of SENAD’s Forensic Laboratory, said in statements published on the website HOY.“They combined these varieties, obtained the hybrids, and took the cuttings from the mother crops to continue growing and producing marijuana with higher THC [levels],” Galeano said.In other operations aimed at seizing regular marijuana, SENAD agents destroyed a warehouse in the Sargento José Félix López district, in Concepción department, on October 4.“We detected two narco-camps and seized more than 2.7 tons of processed marijuana during a raid,” SENAD said.last_img read more

Supreme Court hands down Bar rules opinion

first_img Supreme Court hands down Bar rules opinion Mark D. Killian Managing Editor The Supreme Court recently amended Bar rules to include a statement that a disciplinary resignation is equivalent to disbarment and to provide a limited exemption from reporting misconduct found by staff lawyers with the Bar Law Office Management Assistance Service.Acting on the Bar’s annual rules package — which was filed in February 2000 — the court also adopted a new rule regarding non-Florida lawyers appearing in Florida courts, but remanded for further study a proposal on how to deal with non-Florida lawyers engaged in mediation or arbitration within the state. Case No. SC00-273.The court said all but one comment filed in response to the rules package addressed a proposed amendment which would have eliminated the deferral of the Basic Skills Course Requirement for government attorneys. After reviewing the comments opposing that amendment, the Bar withdrew the proposal in order to allow for discussion with the opponents to that amendment.The remaining substantive proposed changes include amendment to or the creation of the following rules, bylaws and subchapters: Rule 1-3.2 (Membership Classifications); Rule 1-3.5 (Retirement); Rule 1-3.7 (Reinstatement to Membership); new Rule 1-3.10 (Appearances by Non-Florida Lawyers); Rule 1-7.3 (Membership Fees); Subchapter 2-1 (Seal, Emblems, and Publicity Symbols); Bylaw 2-1.2 (Publicity Symbol); Bylaw 2-1.3 (Usage); Bylaw 2-7.3 (Creation of Sections and Divisions); Rule 3-5.1 (Types of Discipline; Generally); Rule 3-7.1 (Confidentiality); Rule 3-7.4 (Grievance Committee Procedures); Rule 3-7.10 (Reinstatement and Readmission Procedures); Rule 3-7.12 (Disciplinary Resignation from The Florida Bar); Rule 4-1.5 (Fees for Legal Services); Rule 4-8.3 (Reporting Professional Misconduct); Rule 4-8.4 (Misconduct); Rule 6-3.2 (Certification Committees); new Rule 6-3.7 (Emeritus Specialist Status); Rule 6-3.10 (Fees); Rule 6-10.3 (Minimum Continuing Legal Education Standards); Rule 6-12.1 (Basic Skills Course Requirement); Rule 6-12.2 (Administration); Rule 6-12.3 (Basic Skills Course Standards); new Rule 6-12.3 (Requirement); new Rule 6-12.4 (Deferment and Exemption); Rule 6-12.4 (Noncompliance and Sanctions); Rule 10-4.1 (UPL Circuit Committees; Generally); Rule 10-7.2 (Proceedings for Indirect Criminal Contempt); and Rule 10-9.1 (Procedures for Issuance of Advisory Opinions on UPL). The full text of the opinion can be found online at www.flcourts.org.The court adopted new Rule 1-3.10 (Appearances by Non-Florida Lawyers). This rule contains provisions formerly found in subdivision (a) of Rule 1-3.2, plus new provisions. The court said the new rule is similar to recently adopted Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.061, concerning foreign attorneys. Consistent with modifications to proposed Rule 2.061, the court modified Rule 1-3.10 to remove references to the term “pro hac vice.” Subdivision (a)(2) of Rule 1-3.10 prohibits “a general practice before Florida courts” which is considered “more than 3 appearances within a 365-day period in separate and unrelated representations.” Subdivisions (a)(3) and (a)(4) specifically prohibit appearances by inactive, suspended, or former members of The Florida Bar, or those sanctioned during prior appearance under the rule. Subdivision (b) prescribes the content of a verified motion filed under the rule.The court also added language to subdivision (b)(4), which clarifies that the only requests to be admitted to practice which must be disclosed in the verified motion are those made to a Florida court.“We reject the Bar’s recommendation to amend Rule 3-4.1 at this time,” the court said. “Under this proposed amendment, non-Florida lawyers would be placed on the same footing as a member of The Florida Bar by being subject to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, including the Rules of Professional Conduct, for any unethical conduct that might occur during the course of the representation.”The court said because it is not clear how the conduct of non-Florida lawyers who are appearing in mediation or arbitration in Florida without being admitted under Bar rules can be regulated by the court, the justices remanded the matter to the Bar for further consideration.The court, however, adopted the Bar’s proposed amendments to Rules 3-7.12 and 3-5.1(j) so as to include the following language:“Disciplinary resignation is the functional equivalent of disbarment in that both sanctions terminate the license and privilege to practice law and both require readmission to practice under the Rules of the Supreme Court Relating to Admissions to the Bar.”The court also added language to Rule 3-5.1(f) that holds, “Disbarment is the presumed sanction for lawyers found guilty of theft from a lawyer’s trust account or special trust fund received or disbursed by a lawyer as guardian, personal representative, receiver, or in a similar capacity such as a trustee under a specific trust document. A respondent found guilty of such theft shall have the opportunity to offer competent, substantial evidence to rebut the presumption that disbarment is appropriate.”The court also amended Rule 4-8.3 (Reporting Professional Misconduct) to provide a limited exception for the Bar’s Law Office Management Assistance Service. The exception states that a lawyer acting on behalf of LOMAS “shall not have an obligation to disclose knowledge of the conduct of another member of The Florida Bar that raises a substantial question as to the other lawyer’s fitness to practice, if the lawyer employed by or acting on behalf of LOMAS acquired the knowledge while engaged in a LOMAS review of the other lawyer’s practice.” If the LOMAS review is conducted as a part of a disciplinary sanction, however, the limitation is not applicable and the LOMAS lawyer is required to report the finding.The court also created new Rule 6-3.7 to create an emeritus specialist status to recognize the contribution of a Board Certified Lawyer in the advancement of the speciality area through related career activities that do not constitute the actual practice of law.The rule states that to seek emeritus specialist status the lawyer shall:• Be currently board certified by The Florida Bar.• Be a member of The Florida Bar in good standing.• No longer be engaged in the practice of law.• Otherwise comply with the applicable rules and policies governing emeritus specialist status. March 1, 2001 Managing Editor Regular News Supreme Court hands down Bar rules opinionlast_img read more