Fourth vCJD case linked with blood transfusion in UK

first_img Variant CJD is the human counterpart of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, which spread through British cattle herds in the 1980s and 1990s. Most vCJD patients are believed to have acquired the fatal brain disease by eating beef from diseased cattle. See also: The United Kingdom uses a number of precautions to protect the blood supply from vCJD infectivity, the HPA noted. Since 1997, new cases of vCJD have triggered a search for and destruction of any blood donated by the case-patient. Since 1998 the United Kingdom has used blood plasma from the United States to produce all plasma derivatives. And since October 1999, white blood cells, which may pose the greatest risk of transmitting vCJD, have been removed from blood used for transfusions. Jan 18 UK HPA news releasehttp://www.hpa.org.uk/hpa/news/articles/press_releases/2007/070118_vCJD.htm Jan 22, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Health officials in the United Kingdom have found a probable fourth case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) associated with a blood transfusion from someone who unknowingly had the disease. Authorities have classified the new case as probable, since vCJD cannot be definitively diagnosed until after death. Postmortem studies have been done on 112 of the 158 vCJD case-patients who have died, and have confirmed the disease in all cases, the HPA said. The case was diagnosed in a patient who received blood 9 years ago from a person who later was found to have vCJD, the UK Health Protection Agency (HPA) said in a Jan 18 statement. All 23 people have previously been informed of their potential exposure to the disease and advised to take precautions to reduce the risk of passing it to others via healthcare procedures, such as surgery, the statement said. “A transfusion from the same blood donor was also associated with one of the previously identified cases,” the HPA said. “The patient is still alive and is under specialist care.” “This new case of vCJD infection increases our concern about the risk to the small group of people who had blood transfusions from donors who unknowingly at the time of donation must have had vCJD infection,” Peter Borrielo, director of the HPA Centre for Infections, said in the news release. “However, this new case does not change our understanding of the risk for other people in any specific way.” The first case of vCJD associated with a blood transfusion was found in December 2003. So far, authorities have identified 66 people in the United Kingdom who have received “vCJD-implicated” transfusions, of whom 40 have died of causes other than vCJD, the HPA said. Twenty-three people are alive and have not been diagnosed with vCJD. Jul 22, 2004, CIDRAP News story “Another UK patient may have caught vCJD from blood” Sep 24, 2004, CIDRAP News story “UK tells blood-product recipients about possible vCJD risk”last_img read more

USC faces South Florida for first time since 1979

first_imgUSC women’s tennis coach Richard Gallien has been coaching tennis for more than 25 years.He’s seen hundreds of players improve, mature and graduate.Quite a few of his players have gone on to become head coaches themselves. But according to Gallien, he has never coached against one of his former players — until today.The No. 17 USC women’s tennis team takes on No. 27 South Florida today at 1:30 p.m. at Marks Tennis Stadium.The Bulls are coached by Agustin Moreno, who Gallien coached at Pepperdine in 1986.“We talk all the time,” Gallien said of Moreno. “He’s a good friend of mine.”Gallien said despite the friendship, both coaches have been keeping it serious.“We’re both a little too tight for [smack talk],” Gallien said.Adding to the seriousness is the cramped schedule of both teams.South Florida is coming off a 5-2 loss at No. 2 Florida last Tuesday and will face San Diego on Sunday.The Women of Troy swept San Diego State last Tuesday and will host Texas on Sunday.With both teams playing three games in five days, there is no time to joke around.“It’s a quick turnaround,” said sophomore Danielle Lao. “But we’re rested and ready.”Gallien says he doesn’t expect his team to take the midweek match lightly.“South Florida’s a very good team,” he said. “They’ve been consistently ranked about 25 in the country for the past three years or so. They have two ranked doubles teams, which is really hard to do.  It’ll be a good match.”Although also USC has a pair of ranked doubles teams, it is an area Gallien feels his team needs to improve in.“We didn’t play that well in doubles against San Diego State,” he said. “I think the girls will be extra motivated and excited to make amends.”Despite their lackluster doubles performances, the Women of Troy did win their first match in a week and a half when they went against the Aztecs.“It was a good win,” Gallien said. “It was good to get some momentum, and now we want to keep it going.”Fans can help the team “keep the momentum” by showing up at Marks Stadium tomorrow afternoon.Admission is free and there will be In-N-Out Burgers available for purchase.The Women of Troy are 1-0 all-time against South Florida with their only other meeting coming in 1979 during the AIAW Nationals.last_img read more