Syracuse women’s lacrosse overcomes poor performance at the draw circle to slip past USC, 12-11

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse’s Kayla Treanor and Southern California’s Michaela Michael stood at midfield. Sudden-death overtime in the NCAA quarterfinals was about to begin and the two stars were getting ready for the biggest draw of the game.Treanor has been a force in her first full season at the draw circle, leading the country by a wide margin with 197 draw controls coming into the game. She relished the opportunity to be in this clutch situation.“When the game gets down to the wire it comes down to who can get control of the draw,” Treanor said earlier in the season. “You feel that pressure a lot, it’s definitely an added pressure, but it’s nice to have control over that.”But USC controlled the draw. And even though the Trojans came into the matchup as the 26th-ranked team in draw controls, that one marked No. 14 on the game. The Orange only had 11.Entering the game, the No. 4 seed Syracuse (19-5, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) had won more draws than its opponents in 18 of its 23 games. But SU didn’t find that same success in this matchup. Instead, the SU defense created timely turnovers and found success on the clear and in its transition offense. Those factors helped lead the Orange to a 12-11 victory over fifth-seeded USC (20-1, 6-0 Mountain Pacific Sports Federation) in the NCAA quarterfinals in the Carrier Dome.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It was just getting (the balls) on the circle and trying to come up with them as a unit,” USC head coach Lindsey Munday said. “… and Michaela did an incredible job of where we wanted her to get it.”The Trojans won seven draws to Syracuse’s four in the first half. Without as many possessions, against the country’s No. 1 defense, the Orange would have to find a way to salvage as many goals as possible.Syracuse scored just five goals in the first half, but that way came via transition opportunities after a successful clear. SU’s first goal came on a free position. After that, the next four goals all came immediately after the Orange successfully cleared the ball. Three of those four came in less than a minute after the clear, and two of those three came within nine seconds of the clear.“They pressure down so it leaves people open if you can kind of get through their pressure ride,” senior defender Mallory Vehar said. “I don’t think we cleared as well as we’d like to but there were some transition goals which were good.”SU, and specifically Vehar, found success causing turnovers in key moments of the game. Vehar caused a turnover with just over two minutes left in the half and USC leading by one, and it led to the Orange’s tying fifth goal. Soon after the Trojans won the opening draw in overtime Vehar caused another turnover.Syracuse’s defense wasn’t perfect against the Trojans, but it made big plays when it needed to and helped the Orange overcome its lack of success in other areas.“We’ve dominated the draw and lost a game before. It comes down to it’s a lot more than just the draw,” Treanor said. Comments Related Stories Halle Majorana propels Syracuse to 12-11 overtime win against USC in NCAA quarterfinalcenter_img Published on May 21, 2016 at 8:14 pm Contact Tomer: tdlanger@syr.edu | @tomer_langerlast_img read more

Angels spring training primer: Starting rotation

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error MOVES THEY COULD MAKEWith so many questions about their top starters, the Angels certainly could use another established arm to provide some insurance. Yu Darvish, Jake Arrieta, Lance Lynn and Alex Cobb are still sitting on the free-agent market. Any of them would upgrade the rotation. The Angels seem unlikely to spend $15 million to $20 million a year, and a second-round draft pick, for one of these pitchers. The next level of free-agent options includes pitchers like Andrew Cashner and Jaime Garcia, whose performances and injury histories carry red flags. If they are to add another starter, it is more likely to be another young starter with options. Ideally, they could find another Bridwell. As the Angels head toward the first workout of spring training Feb. 14, we are providing a breakdown of how they stand with their roster. Players acquired this winter include the method of their acquisition in parentheses. Today, the starting rotation:2017 RECAPFor the second consecutive season, the Angels rotation was ravaged by injuries. Garrett Richards, Tyler Skaggs, Andrew Heaney and Matt Shoemaker — arguably their four most talented starters — all missed significant chunks of the season. In Heaney’s case, it should be noted, the fact that he pitched at all after having Tommy John surgery in 2016 was an unexpected positive. Nonetheless, the Angels’ starters posted a 4.38 ERA, which was sixth in the league. JC Ramirez and Parker Bridwell were two of the pleasant surprises that helped keep them afloat.HOW IT LOOKS RIGHT NOWThe Angels added one of the top starting pitchers on the market, winning the sweepstakes for Japanese star Shohei Ohtani (minor league deal).  Ohtani has the stuff to be an ace, but he’s only 23 and has never pitched in the majors, so the Angels will try not to heap too much pressure on him. Part of that is the likely decision to go with some form of a six-man rotation, although off days could allow them to still use five at times. The Angels are hoping the extra rest also helps keep the other pitchers healthy. Expect Richards, Heaney, Skaggs and Shoemaker to join Ohtani in the rotation, with some combination of Ramirez (who can also pitch out of the bullpen), Bridwell, Nick Tropeano and prospect Jaime Barria filling in the blanks. It is a rotation full of potential. Of the seven pitchers who have pitched in the big leagues, all of them have been good in the majors for months at a time. Most of them have also had extended slumps, too, leaving each to prove his consistency.THE NEXT LAYERTroy Scribner, who managed a 4.18 ERA in his rookie season despite underwhelming stuff, is likely to be one of the first options at Triple-A, after Barria. Beyond that, the best starting pitching prospects who could reach the majors in 2018 are Jesus Castillo, Osmer Morales, Jake Jewell and Alex Klonowski.last_img read more