Digna Strautmane named ACC Rookie of the Week for second-straight week

first_img Published on February 5, 2018 at 4:30 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Freshman forward Digna Strautmane, in a week when Syracuse (17-7, 5-6 Atlantic Coast) didn’t win, picked up ACC Rookie of the Week honors for the second-straight week.It’s the third time this season that Strautmane has received the accolade. It’s also the third-straight week that a Syracuse freshman took home rookie of the week honors since Amaya Finklea-Guity won the award two weeks ago.The Orange was unable to overcome Virginia Tech or No. 4 Louisville at home, but Strautmane led SU in scoring in both contests. Against the Hokies she put up 20 points and added five rebounds. On Sunday against the Cardinals, Strautmane dropped 22 points to go along with four assists and two blocks.The 6-foot-2 forward from Riga, Latvia, has now scored in double-figures in five-straight games. Among ACC freshman, Strautmane ranks fourth with her 10.4 points per contest.Strautmane also places on the national leaderboard in blocks per game. Her 2.08 blocks per game puts her 45th in the country. It also places second in the ACC behind Virginia’s Felicia Aiyeotan, a 6-foot-9 sophomore.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

High Point’s Chris Young has transformed from faceoff specialist to prolific scorer

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 11, 2019 at 11:30 am Contact Eric: estorms@syr.edu Chris Young knew he couldn’t miss again. On Feb. 6, then-unranked High Point traveled to Durham, North Carolina, to face then-No.2 Duke. Young had already scored three times, but an earlier doorstep-shot got stuffed and the miss stayed with Young. So in the fourth quarter, Young noticed empty twine up three, ripped and scored. Just three years earlier, Young was at Penn State, struggling for playing time as a faceoff specialist — the position he’d been recruited for at two different schools. But with a background in box lacrosse, Young grew up playing every position. After the seventh game of the 2017 season, Young stopped taking tries at the faceoff-X. Now a permanent attack, he scored 16 goals in 14 games his redshirt-sophomore year. This season for No. 13 High Point (9-2, 3-1 Southern), he’s already scored 36 in 11, a per-game scoring-average high enough for ninth in the nation (3.27). Once under-recruited as a faceoff specialist, Young went off the board at 28th overall in this year’s Major League Lacrosse Draft, taken by the Ohio Machine. “The way that he plays attack you would think he’s been playing it his whole life,” teammate Asher Nolting said.While playing box lacrosse in Canada, Young idolized Shawn Evans who proved to Young, now at 5-foot-8, that he could be dominant in the sport despite a lack of size. Young grew up training with his older brother, Sean, who played as a defenseman for Syracuse and was drafted 37th overall in the 2015 MLL Draft. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textYoung attended The Hill Academy, a sports-focused center in Ontario. There, he “basically learned everything” about lacrosse. Young worked on stick skills, off-ball movement and, most importantly, how to win a faceoff. His talent at the faceoff-X earned him interest from Robert Morris, where he committed in 2015.But then Young spoke with Penn State head coach Jeff Tambroni who said there was a spot for him at the faceoff-X. Young connected with PSU in a way he hadn’t with RMU. On the field, though, Young struggled to get playing time and felt “lost in the shuffle” at such a big school. After deciding to transfer, he said he fell in love with High Point despite not knowing if his role would be any different. Alex Woodall, the Panthers’ former faceoff option, transferred and opened up a spot in the starting lineup.Courtesy of High Point AthleticsIn his first season at High Point, he remained at the X, winning 33-0f-94 in 2017.  But coaches believed that Young’s versatility could transfer to attack. After splitting time in the beginning of the season, Young took his last draw against Providence on March 11, 2017. In 2018, Young’s attacking prowess had developed. Young is a true crease attackman, High Point offensive coordinator Ken Broschart said. Young rarely leaves a 10-yard radius around the net and pairs with it his rides that make him one of the best in the country, Broschart said. Young kept adapting to the position at a collegiate level. Broschart noticed Young’s developed lacrosse IQ have made him an even more well-rounded player, especially in terms of his hands and finishing. With High Point down 3-0 early to then-No. 9 Virginia on Feb. 18, Nolting fired a pass inside to Young. Young shot but hit the shaft of the goalie’s stick and the ball bounced away. “I don’t think I could’ve missed that if I had a baseball bat in my hand,” Young joked to Nolting shortly after. For the rest of the contest, Nolting said the rest of the attack “loosened up.”Despite a slow start, it was a turning point for the group. The Panthers scored the next five goals and went on to win 14-13.Nolting said he and his teammates often jokingly give Young a hard time that he has the easiest job on the team since all he has to do is catch and shoot. In the two years since switching to attack — from being a specialist to a top-option — Young has embraced it.“I think a lot of players are the same even at the highest levels,” Broschart said. “A lot of players do a certain thing and (Young) does something that’s really unique in terms of how he finishes where you really have to change your whole slide package around him, you know you can’t leave him on the crease.” Commentslast_img read more

Esports Integrity Coalition widens international scope

first_img Parimatch combats esports corruption with ESIC membership February 20, 2020 Submit Share StumbleUpon Related Articles Share ESI Digital – No Drama Please… Esports growth should be treated as business as usual  August 20, 2020 Cyber.bet tackles esports corruption joining ESIC June 17, 2020 The Esports Integrity Coalition (ESIC) has announced the addition of three new members to the organisation, as it reinforces its position as a global body dedicated to combating all forms of corruption and cheating in the world of esports.The first member, Geem, is a digital esports platform based in Dubai. Geem is positioned to provide daily online competitions to the largely untapped, burgeoning esports community in the Middle East.The second, UMG, is a rapidly growing esports platform, matchmaker and tournament organiser linking players of every level across a range of games.Meanwhile LVP is a Spanish tournament organiser and gaming platform.Esports Integrity Commissioner Ian Smith said: “We are delighted to welcome all our new members to the Esports Integrity Coalition. Each one is doing something remarkable in their country or with exciting new technologies and we can’t wait to work with them to continue keeping the world of esports free from corruption, match manipulation, betting fraud and doping.”Geem Founder Charles Wright added: “One of our first moves after curating GEEM, before we had even launched our platform or hosted a tournament, was to join ESIC. We have a staunch outlook on creating a credible and safe environment for esports growth in the MENA Region. As we pivot and scale the platform, ESIC’s mission will remain at the core of all our offerings. The Middle East region is one to watch out for!.” UMG CEO Dave Antony said: “All of us at UMG believe in having the highest level of standards for ourselves, our products, and our gaming community. Joining the ESIC solidifies our commitment to our community and partners that we are making every effort to keep our gaming space fair and safe for all gamers everywhere, online and at live events.” Sergi Mesonero, Head of Institutional Relations at LVP, said: “The LVP enters the Esports Integrity Coalition with great pride and a greater sense of responsibility. As the engine that has powered the Spanish esports ecosystem since 2011, at the LVP we aim for competitions 100% free of manipulation and fraud, true to the values that have governed us from the very beginning: sportsmanship and fair play.”last_img read more