Report on competency-based learning offers roadmap for state education officials

first_imgA new report released July 18 discusses how state leaders in K-12 education are rethinking policies to allow students to advance competency-based approaches that allow any time, everywhere learning for today’s youth.‘Unfortunately, many states and school districts are still handcuffed by rigid regulations that prevent them from moving toward the student-centered, performance-based approach,’ Patrick said. ‘This report offers guidance and practical recommendations for state education policymakers.’‘We are proposing what amounts to a vital change in current methods of instruction and measurement so that students can move ahead when they demonstrate knowledge,’ said Susan Patrick, co-author of the report and president of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL).Titled, Cracking the Code: Synchronizing Policy and Practice for Performance-based Learning, the report was unveiled at the Summer Institute of the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) in Stowe, Vermont. Co-authored by Chris Sturgis, a principal at MetisNet, the report is based on policy recommendations made by education innovators during the 2011 Competency-based Learning Summit convened by iNACOL and CCSSO earlier this year.The report recommends that states begin to transform policies from ‘rigid compliance’ to ‘enabling policies,’ by offering seat-time waivers or ‘credit flex’ policies that allow for the flexibility to offer competency-based learning in K-12 education.A ‘comprehensive policy redesign’ would require competency-based credits, personalized learning plans, information technology, professional development, and quality-control in support of individual student growth for accountability, while aligning higher education with K-12 competency-based efforts. The report also offers states a number of approaches toward tackling emerging state policy issues in order to speed the transition to a competency-based approach.Sturgis said, ‘With state leadership creating the necessary policy conditions to enable children to progress when they have mastered skills, we will finally be able to overcome the inequities of our current education system.’‘Competency-based learning is essential to a future for students in the United States to remain globally competitive, and this transformation in enabling policy must begin at the state level,’ said Patrick.The report is available at www.inacol.org(link is external).About iNACOLiNACOL is the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, a non-profit 501(c)(3) membership association based in the Washington, DC area with more than 3,800 members.iNACOL is unique in that its members represent a diverse cross-section of K-12 education from school districts, charter schools, state education agencies, non-profit organizations, colleges, universities and research institutions, corporate entities and other content and technology providers (www.inacol.org(link is external)). iNACOL hosts the annual Virtual School Symposium (VSS). VSS 2011 is being held Nov. 9 – 11, 2011 in Indianapolis, IN (www.virtualschoolsymposium.org(link is external)).  STOWE, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–7.18.2011last_img read more

Saints QB Drew Brees apologizes again for comments: ‘I will do better’

first_img“I am sorry and I will do better and I will be part of the solution and I am your ally and I know no words will do that justice.”Brees’ comments came almost four years after sports stars across the globe kneeled during anthems, echoing Colin Kaepernick’s demonstration during his time in the NFL.Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback, sat and then took a knee during the national anthem in protest against racial injustice and police brutality. Step-by-step you will see my heart for exactly what it is and the way everyone around me sees it. I’m sorry it has taken this long to act and to participate in a meaningful way but I am your ally in this fight.A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on Jun 4, 2020 at 5:30pm PDT”I wish I would’ve laid out what was on my heart in regards to the George Floyd murder, Ahmaud Arbery, the years and years of social injustice, police brutality and the need for so much reform and change in regards to legislation and so many other things to bring equality to our black communities. View this post on Instagram Saints quarterback Drew Brees apologized again Thursday, a day after saying he disagreed with protests when players kneel during the national anthem.Brees, 41, faced criticism after his comments on Wednesday, although the veteran first apologized Thursday morning. MORE: Thomas, Kamara among Saints to forgive BreesHis comments came a little more than a week after George Floyd died in police custody in Minneapolis last week, prompting demonstrations across the United States and beyond.After posting a lengthy apology on Instagram, Brees later produced a video to again say he was sorry.”I know there’s not much that I can say that would make things any better right now, but I just want you to see in my eyes how sorry I am for the comments that I made (Wednesday),” he said. “I know that it hurt many people, especially friends, teammates, former teammates, loved ones, people that I care and respect deeply. That was never my intention.last_img read more