U.S. must lead fight against killer pollution

first_imgHarmful particulates, toxic chemicals and smog-forming gases result from fuel burning, from primitive dung-fired cooking stoves to massive coal-burning power plants.These and other forms of pollution promote asthma, heart disease, stroke, lung cancer and other maladies.Premature death is only one problem.Long-term impairment before death also results in human misery and material impoverishment. Developing nations, many of which lack strong environmental enforcement, are much worse off than developed countries, the study found.Poor and middle-income nations account for 92 percent of the premature deaths globally.Pollution drives a full quarter of deaths in some lower-income countries. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post. A major study published last month in the Lancet, a British medical journal, found that there is a global killer responsible for more yearly deaths than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined.Pollution.The problem is pervasive, affecting every country on the planet.It is expensive, costing the globe a whopping $4.6 trillion a year — about 6 percent of global gross domestic product — in hours not worked, premature deaths, health spending and eroded quality of life.The study associated pollution with 1 in 6 premature deaths, 9 million people in 2015.Even if the numbers are off a bit, the magnitude is striking.Air pollution is the leading culprit, linked to 6.5 million deaths, followed by water pollution, with 1.8 million. The study’s authors argue that this human toll is not the inevitable price of development, nor a problem that will simply disappear with growth; countries should not “wait for an economy to reach a magical tipping point that will solve the problems of environmental degradation and pollution-related disease,” they write. Instead, the authors insist, developing nations should look to the United States.The creation of the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970 and the enforcement of the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act, each passed in the early 1970s and updated since, resulted in dramatic reductions in harmful pollution, over a period of time in which the economy more than doubled in size.Not every pollution restriction that environmentalists dream up makes sense.But mandating relatively cheap pollution controls or, when possible, simply taxing polluters for the damage they do can result in a good value proposition for developing and developed nations alike. Poor countries struggling to pull their citizens out of abject poverty may yet find it tough to take the long view.Many Americans, including those in the Trump administration, still fail to do so. Conservative critics of environmental rules often overstate the potential costs of pollution controls and discount the benefits.The Trump administration is on this basis weakening pollution rules across the board, sending an early signal about its approach by tapping Scott Pruitt, a climate-change denier, to lead the EPA.Yet the United States has hardly finished the job; the nation still sees tons of pollution pumped into the air, directly harming people and contributing to global warming.Meanwhile, the federal government has not yet addressed other forms of pollution, such as toxic chemical exposure, with needed rigor, and the Trump administration has sent negative signals about its intentions to do so. The Lancet study should remind leaders in the United States and elsewhere that, though there are costs associated with restricting pollution, countries also incur costs by failing to do so.Finding the right balance requires acknowledging both sides and weighing them carefully.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Governor Wolf, Clarion University Announce Opioid Treatment Specialist Certificate

first_img Education,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Governor Wolf was joined today by Clarion University President Dr. Karen Whitney; Dr. Ray Feroz, Chair of the Clarion University Department of Human Services, Rehabilitation, Health and Sport Sciences; PA Department of Health Acting Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine, and PA Department of Drug and Alcohol Program Acting Secretary Jennifer Smith, to announce Clarion University’s online Opioid Treatment Specialist certificate program.The program, the first of its kind in the state, is the university’s response to the growing epidemic in the state.“Fighting the ongoing battle against heroin and opioid abuse in the state is a top priority of my administration,” Governor Wolf said. “I’m proud to announce this new curriculum with Clarion University because education is a powerful force in this fight and it is my sincere hope that people take advantage of this opportunity to learn more about opioid addiction and what part we can each play in this effort.”First offered in the fall 2017 semester, the 12-credit, four-course certificate program is available to anyone. There are no prerequisites, but the university advises that the program might be most beneficial to professionals who want to strengthen their credentials or to current students who want to graduate with stronger job prospects.“Clarion continues to align its academic programs to the needs of the commonwealth,” said Dr. Karen Whitney. “Through Clarion University online, and with our new College of Health and Human Services, we have the ability to equip students and professionals locally, regionally, and even nationally with the tools they need to better respond to the opioid epidemic. This program will save lives.”“The certificate was developed to educate treatment professionals in prevention and treatment of opioid abuse and addiction,” said Dr. Ray Feroz. “It is one way Clarion can aid in combating the statewide and nationwide opioid crisis.”The certificate is designed to be offered across two consecutive semesters with all four courses in seven-week formats, so a certificate can be earned in one academic year, beginning in either the fall or spring semester.For more information, including estimated costs, visit www.clarion.edu/opioidspecialist, or call Clarion Admissions at 800-672-7171, ext. 1. SHARE Email Facebook Twitter July 12, 2017center_img Governor Wolf, Clarion University Announce Opioid Treatment Specialist Certificatelast_img read more

Governor Wolf Announces 60,000 Additional Naloxone Kits Available for First Responders Statewide

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces 60,000 Additional Naloxone Kits Available for First Responders Statewide October 20, 2017 Press Release,  Public Safety,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf and first responders gathered in Homewood at Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire Station #17 to thank first responders and announce the increased availability of live-saving Naloxone to first responders and law enforcement across the state. The funding, available through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, is being used to purchase approximately 60,000 Naloxone kits.“Naloxone is an incredibly important and lifesaving tool because we cannot get our loved ones, our neighbors, the members of our communities the treatment they need if they die from an overdose of prescription opioids or heroin,” Gov. Wolf said.“Every day, our first responders are saving the lives of Pennsylvanians by administering naloxone and reversing deadly overdoses. Those first responders have already reversed over 3,900 opioid overdoses since 2014. We need to support them in this effort and that’s why this funding from my 2017-18 budget is so critical.”“The range of first responders eligible for naloxone use is much broader than those folks we commonly think of as first responders, such as law enforcement and firemen,” PCCD Chairman Charles Ramsey said. “Individuals who find themselves in positions of being the first person able to respond to an overdose – such as librarians, public transit drivers, and drug treatment providers – are also eligible for the naloxone made available through this state funding.”NARCAN®(naloxone HCI) Nasal Spray is needle-free and does not require assembly. It’s designed for ease of use for nonmedical personnel.  Each kit includes two, 4-milligram doses and will be available to all 67 counties over a two-year period using $5 million in state funding. The kits are supplied by Adapt Pharma.“As a proud Pennsylvania company based in Radnor, we are honored to partner with the commonwealth to increase awareness of and access to NARCAN® Nasal Spray, the only FDA-approved, needle-free formulation of 4-milligram naloxone that does not require assembly or any specialized medical training,” Thomas Duddy, Adapt Pharma Executive Director, Communications said.In addition to Adapt Pharma and first responders, Gov. Wolf was joined by Senator Jay Costa and Representative Ed Gainey, Democratic chairs of the HOPE caucus, a group of state legislators committed to ensuring every Pennsylvanian has access to high quality prevention and treatment of the disease of substance use disorder; Derin Myers, Executive Deputy Secretary of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency; Jennifer Smith, Acting Secretary for the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs; Dr. Karen Hacker, Allegheny County Department of Health; Wendell Hissrich, Director of Public Safety for the city of Pittsburgh; and Darryl Jones, Chief, Bureau of Fire.The Wolf Administration’s Physician General and Acting Secretary for the Department of Health Dr. Rachel Levine issued a standing order for naloxone in October 2015.In addition, the Gov. Wolf and state agencies have been increasing efforts in the heroin and opioid epidemic fight in multiple additional areas, including numerous programs and initiatives:Working with the legislature to establish a new law limiting the number of opioids that can be prescribed to a minor and to individuals discharged from emergency rooms to seven days;Strengthening the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) through the legislative process so that doctors are required and able to check the system each time they prescribe opioids and benzodiazepines. To date, there have been more than 12 million patient searches made on the system;Forming new prescribing guidelines to help doctors who provide opioid prescriptions to their patients, including guidelines specific to orthopedics and sports medicine;Creating the warm handoff guideline to facilitate referrals from the emergency department to substance abuse treatment;Teaming with the legislature to establish education curriculum on safe prescribing for medical schools;Educating and encouraging patients to properly use, store and dispose of unused prescription medications through drug take-back initiatives, and expanding the number of drug take-back locations to nearly 700.For more information on the standing order for naloxone, visit the Department of Health’s website. For more information about the naloxone application process, visit the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency’s website.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Wm. Leroy “Lee” Humpert, 82

first_imgWm Leroy “Lee” Humpert, 82, of Greensburg, Indiana, passed on Tuesday, May 19, 2020, at Aspen Place. Lee was born December 12, 1937 in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Cornelius and Alice (Toon) Humpert.  Lee was a graduate of Elder High School in 1956, a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, College of Engineering in 1961, and a graduate of Xavier University’s MBA program in 1966. Lee served ten years in the US Army reserves. He married Diane Christine Mayr in 1960 and together they had four sons, and she survives.  Lee was employed by Cincinnati Incorporated, Black and Decker, York Wallcoverings, and Flexi, USA. Lee was an avid golfer, was a member of the TCA for many years, and a lifetime member of the Knights of Columbus.  He was a member of St. Mary’s parish in Greensburg. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his sons, Todd William and Neal Christian. Survivors include his wife, sons, Lance Humpert of King of Prussia, PA and Scott (Cathy) Humpert of Dillsburg, PA, grandsons, Charles, Benjamin, and Nicholas Humpert, brother, Kenneth Neal (Laverne) Humpert of Harrison, Ohio and sister, April Goldfuss of Fayetteville, Ohio, sister-in-law, Judith L. (William) Miller of Cincinnati, Ohio and several nieces and nephews. Due to the recent public health safety mandate of limited gatherings a graveside blessing will be conducted at a later date by Father John Meyer for immediate family only. Memorials may be made to the Our Hospice of South Central Indiana, 946 E. Main St., Greensburg, IN 47240 or to St. Mary’s Church, 1331 E. Hunter Robbins Way, Greensburg, IN 47240. Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

BH Paralympic Ilma Kazazic is fourth at the Europe Cup!

first_imgBH Paralympic representative in Alpine skiing Ilma Kazazic was competing in the Dutch Landgraaf this weekend within IPCAS competitions and the European Cup.This great skier with her performance in Landgraaf enabled the flag of BiH to wave at the big sports event as the European Cup for the first time in the history of Paralympic skiing.Popular BH snowflake took an excellent fourth place in this prestigious competition.“I drove for my professor. This, very important race for me and my country, I dedicate to my recently deceased coach and father of alpine skiing for persons with disabilities in BiH, Professor Hadzi Senad Turkovic”.Kazazic started the season 2016/17 with a very successful performance at IPCAS races on the 15th and 16th of November, where in the overall standings in a very strong competition of 24 competitors she won 9th place, and 8th place in the second race.With this performance, our national team member managed to lower the points on the border of achieving norm for the World Cup, which will be held in January in the Italian Traves.No matter that this young competitor had to travel alone to training and competitions due to a reduction of financial expenses, she thanked to representations of Croatia and Serbia for their support for her training in Austria and the performance on the competition in the Netherlands.New performance of this great skier is expected in Pitztal in Austria, from the 9th to 15th of December, and she promised a good result again.(Source: klix.ba)last_img read more