Professional Touch Football Training Programs

first_imgPro Training Programs, together with Touch Football Australia (TFA), gives you the chance to train like the Australian national Touch Football teams.Pro Training Programs for Touch Football are written by TFA’s High Performance Manager, Wayne Grant. These training programs are scientifically designed for maximum Touch Football performance enhancement.Don’t waste weeks or months following a poor training program. What you do is more important than how you do it.So train like the professionals and get the most reward from your efforts at training!Touch Football-based Speed and Agility and Strength and Conditioning programs are now available to be purchased online, and can be found at the link below:Touch Football Training Related LinksTraining Programslast_img read more

Canada faces new trade tests from Italy as feds battle challenges on

first_imgOTTAWA – Add Italy to the growing list of Canada’s trade headaches.Italy’s agriculture minister said his country’s new government won’t ratify the Canada-European Union free trade accord, media reports said Thursday. Gian Marco Centinaio, whose government is led by a populist coalition, also insisted he’s heard doubts about the 28-country deal from many of his European colleagues.The development adds to Canada’s collection of trade challenges, which already include deep uncertainty surrounding the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement, hefty steel and aluminium tariffs imposed recently by the United States and the threat of more to come on automobiles.Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, in Washington on Thursday to try to jump start stalled NAFTA negotiations, told reporters she believes Italy will eventually sign on to the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement, or CETA.Freeland noted that Austria was initially reluctant to ratify CETA, but eventually came around.“I’m confident we will have full ratification at the end,” said Freeland, who added she had a “good” conversation about CETA with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte during last weekend’s G7 summit in Quebec.Ninety-eight per cent of CETA came into effect last September on a provisional basis. The deal was settled in 2016 after years of talks, but all E.U. nations must now vote on it independently.NAFTA, however, was the main topic of discussion for Freeland on Thursday during an hour-long meeting with U.S. trade czar Robert Lighthizer.Canada, Mexico and the U.S. will continue negotiating NAFTA through the summer, although specific dates haven’t been set, she said.“We’re going to make a real push over the summer,” said Freeland, who called the meeting “constructive.”“I think all three countries are clear that meaningful progress has been made to date and we need to keep working hard to get to a deal.”Several Canadian cabinet ministers have been reaching out to their American counterparts this week in an effort to advance NAFTA talks and to persuade the Trump administration to back down from his steel and aluminum tariffs.Lighthizer and Freeland also discussed the tariffs, which have been at the centre of an increasingly ugly dispute between the U.S. and many of its closest allies, including Canada.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has called the tariffs “insulting” because they are based on the premise Canada poses a national security risk to the U.S. and has announced dollar-for-dollar retaliatory duties on a wide range of American imports. Trudeau’s push back earned him an unprecedented personal attack from Trump and his emissaries after the G7 summit.The E.U. and other countries have also threatened retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. The Canadian countermeasures are to go into effect July 1.During her meeting with Lighthizer, Freeland said she underlined Canada’s concerns over what she calls the “illegal” national-security consideration.“I was very clear about that. I’m confident that Ambassador Lighthizer heard and understood that,” she said.“The Canadian strategy on the tariffs was, and will continue to be, that we will not escalate and we also will not back down.”Brian Kingston of the Business Council of Canada was encouraged to hear the NAFTA talks could continue this summer. He said staying at the table could lead to progress on smaller issues while the process navigates the upcoming Mexican presidential election and the U.S. congressional midterms, which are both expected to slow things down.“You can kind of clear out that undergrowth, take brackets off texts and get to a point where we’ve just got those big issues and we can make a deal,” said Kingston, the council’s vice-president of international and fiscal policy.On CETA, Kingston said the comments from Italy were “concerning.” But he noted its provisional implementation means the commercial benefits are already being realized and that there’s no set timeline for E.U. states to ratify.Without ratification, however, the agreement’s investment provisions and its investor court system won’t come into force, he said.“Obviously, for certainty reasons, people prefer this to be done relatively quickly,” said Kingston, whose group represents many of Canada’s largest corporations.“Companies always benefit from having investment certainty when they’re entering into a market. So, having those investment provisions would be absolutely beneficial.”International Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne visited Italy a few days ago to sell the merits of CETA to the new Italian government, which took power on June 1.On Thursday, Champagne said 12 countries have already ratified the deal and he argued Italy’s exports to Canada are up eight per cent since the provisional agreement came into effect. He called it a “gold standard” deal because it offers protections for the environment and labour rights.Champagne also introduced legislation Thursday in Parliament in support of the controversial 11-nation, Pacific Rim trade pact, which is known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership.Ottawa attracted criticism for the move as groups, including the United Steelworkers and Council of Canadians, warned the CPTPP is a business-friendly deal that will give multinationals the power to sue governments in Canada.“The Liberal government is set to fast-track Canada’s inclusion in the TPP, while most Canadians know little about the impact of this secretly negotiated trade agreement,” United Steelworkers national director Ken Neumann said in a statement.“It will worsen inequality, further erode Canada’s manufacturing and industrial base. It will eliminate more middle-class jobs, increase drug prices and drive down wages, working conditions and environmental standards.”Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitterlast_img read more

Democrats plan more pressure on Trump to reopen government

first_imgWASHINGTON — Newly empowered House Democrats are planning to step up pressure on President Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers to reopen the government.This comes after there was no weekend breakthrough to end a prolonged partial government shutdown, with Trump standing firm in his border wall funding demands.Trump showed no signs of budging on his demand for more than $5 billion for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, though on Sunday he did offer to build it with steel rather than concrete, a concession Democrats panned.With the shutdown lurching into a third week, many Republicans watched nervously from the sidelines as hundreds of thousands of federal workers went without pay and government disruptions hit the lives of ordinary Americans.Catherine Lucey And Lisa Mascaro, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Like old photos memories fade over time

first_imgLike old photographs, the visual quality of our memories declines over time, according to a study. When people remember the past, they remember it with varying degrees of clarity. Sometimes people remember lots of details about an event, as if they are reliving the moment as it happened, said Maureen Ritchey, an assistant professor at Boston College in the US. Other times, it seems like the memory has faded, and the details are fuzzy, according to the study published in the journal Psychological Science. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainPrevious research has shown that emotionally significant events – like a car accident – are remembered more vividly than everyday events. “We wanted to know whether this feeling of memory vividness is related to not just what is remembered, but how it is remembered – the visual quality of the memory,” Ritchey said in a statement. She said people reported changes to their memories akin to using a filter to edit a picture. “A simple analogy is what happens when you post a photo on Instagram. You are cued to apply a filter that changes the brightness or colour saturation of the image,” Ritchey said. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma AwardIn three experiments, participants studied emotionally negative and neutral images that varied in visual quality – luminance and colour saturation. They then reconstructed the visual qualities of each image in a subsequent test. The findings revealed that memories were recollected as less visually vibrant than they were encoded, demonstrating a novel memory-fading effect, the researchers said. Negative emotions subjects experienced when viewing the images increased the likelihood that images would be accurately remembered but did not influence memory fading. In addition, subjective ratings of memory vividness were lower for less accurate memories and for memories that had visually faded, the team found. These findings provide evidence that the vibrancy of low-level details – such as colours and shapes associated with an event – fade in memory while the gist of the experience is retained. People may remember going to a music festival and watching their favourite band, but the intensity of that sensory experience, including the bright stage lights and strength of the bass, will slowly fade. “We found that memories seem to literally fade: people consistently remembered visual scenes as being less vibrant than they were originally experienced,” said post-doctoral researcher Rose Cooper. “We had expected that memories would get less accurate after a delay, but we did not expect that there would be this qualitative shift in the way that they were remembered,” Cooper said. The fading effect happened less for memories that were rated as subjectively stronger. “We were also surprised to find that emotional memories did not influence the amount of fading, only the likelihood with which people remembered the images at all,” she added.last_img read more

Virtual reality can help people with dementia

first_imgVirtual reality (VR) technology can enhance the quality of life for people with dementia by helping them to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, says a study. The technology helped patients recall old memories by providing new stimuli difficult to achieve, due to ill health, or inaccessible within a secure environment, said the team from the University of Kent in the UK. These memories not only provided positive mental stimulation for the patients but also helped their caregivers learn more about their lives before care, thereby improving their social interaction. Also Read – The Puja carnival”VR can clearly have positive benefits for patients with dementia, their families and caregivers. It provides a richer and more satisfying quality of life than is otherwise available, with many positive outcomes,” said Jim Ang, Professor at the University of Kent. For the study, the researchers picked eight patients aged between 41 and 88 who are living with dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Each patient used a VR headset to ‘visit’ one of five virtual environments of a cathedral, a forest, a sandy beach, a rocky beach and a countryside scene. Also Read – Wave City brings special offers this NavratraThe sessions were monitored with feedback gathered from patients and their caregivers. The patients also demonstrated their own choices during the experiment, with some keen to explore different VEs within a session, while others explored the same environment repeatedly. “With further research it will be possible to evaluate the elements of virtual environments that benefit patients and use VR even more effectively,” Jim Ang added.last_img read more

Resolving insolvency

first_imgBankruptcies are a painful process for businesses, employees, and business partners but are an inevitable consequence of business dynamics and competition. As industries, companies and economic trends evolve, some companies will be left behind and will have to comprehend the bankruptcy in some way or the other. Bankruptcies and related issues have a lot to teach us regarding a speedier resolution of issues, acceptance of bankruptcies as a result of business dynamics and regulations that maximise recovery value. Also Read – Hijacking Bapu’s legacyWhile further economic growth and investment impetus will be essential, the maturity of the business ecosystem to accept bankruptcies as one of the elements of business will be equally important. For the overall economic system, the focus must be on a structured, fair and quick bankruptcy process. While there is short-term pain around bankrupt businesses, a well-structured and expedited resolution process leads to freeing resources tied up in bankrupt companies for deployment in higher growth projects elsewhere and create employment. Also Read – The future is here!With the bankruptcy regime in India evolving and improving, the focus must be on reducing, even more, the time required to resolve bankruptcies for improving the “time value of money”. Given the long-drawn process that bankruptcy proceedings are, even incremental reductions in the time taken to resolve the issues results in significant value addition for creditors and the business ecosystem. While the focus on time-reduction in the bankruptcy resolution process must not be at the cost of propriety, a renewed focus on this is essential. Not only will time-reduction benefit the creditors, but the flow of recovered credit onto the next viable projects in the economy will have a significant impact on credit creation, investments and business sentiment. One of the issues India has had to face in the last five years has been the double whammy of a slowdown in credit growth, and the opportunity cost of lost income for banks as capital stuck in bankrupt projects has not generated the additional revenue that was possible if it were recovered and lent out elsewhere profitably. The slowdown in credit growth due to bankruptcies has been driven by both a reluctance to lend and a reduction in the availability of capital. A lack of lending to both businesses and individuals has resulted in lower investment and lower consumption, trends that will be gradually reversed as bankruptcy resolutions come by. As capital available to lend declined due to unresolved bankruptcies, income earned by banks suffered not only due to non-performing assets (NPAs) but also due to the opportunity cost of not having access to capital that would have otherwise earned income for them. A robust bankruptcy resolution mechanism can help alleviate the problem. Most importantly, avoiding the vicious credit cycle of lower capital availability leading to poor financial returns, which in turns leads to further credit constraints can be avoided through effective mechanisms. Therefore, an effective bankruptcy redressal system adds significant value to the banking system by both the provision of capital and also additional income on the said capital that can be utilised elsewhere. The recent bankruptcies such as Jet Airways and credit issues that Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) faced has also brought to the fore certain voices advocating for the government to step in to rescue troubled businesses. The focus for the government must be on continually improving the bankruptcy mechanism by reducing the time required for resolutions and addressing issues that the credit ecosystem may face. However, it is not the government’s role to bail out private businesses since we cannot have situations whereby profits are private, and losses are passed on to the exchequer and the taxpayer. Bankruptcies are unavoidable residues of the economy. If handled well they help to cleanse the economy as inefficient businesses fall behind and efficient ones race ahead. The government’s role is that of a facilitator of the overall ecosystem, rather than a capital provider in situations of distress. If done well short-term pain can lead to significant gains for the overall economy down the road.(The author heads Development Tracks, an infrastructure advisory firm. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Commentary Fans jeering Gene Smith cheering Luke Fickell makes for quite a

My favorite halftime show of the Ohio State men’s basketball games is undoubtedly when they bring in that guy who has all the Frisbee-catching dogs. It doesn’t get any better than that.But Sunday’s halftime spectacle which included the basketball crowd cheering OSU defensive coordinator Luke Fickell and jeering athletic director Gene Smith gave the Frisbee guy a run for his money.Here’s what was supposed to happen.New OSU football coach Urban Meyer was supposed to come on the court and introduce his family and coaching staff to the fans. The eager crowd would snap some pictures and cheer excitedly. The staff would wave to some babies and walk off.What actually transpired was much more interesting.I don’t know whose bright idea it was, but I guess it wasn’t acceptable for Meyer to take the microphone and do the introductions himself. Someone had to introduce Meyer so he could get a nice little cheer.There’s nothing wrong with that. It was the first time Meyer had been formally introduced to the fans in a setting other than a press conference.But I will never understand the decision to have Smith introduce Meyer. John Schmo sitting in the nosebleeds would have been a better choice.So before Meyer took the floor, Smith started his walk out to center court.Before he got there, the boos started. It wasn’t just one or two knuckleheads who had a little bit too much fun before the game. It was a chorus, mostly of students, heckling Smith.Not everyone participated and it certainly wasn’t a drowning noise, but people weren’t happy.My question is who let Smith walk out there? The adverse reaction is hardly a surprise. The OSU football program has been riddled with controversy and scandal for more than a year and it’s no secret that more than a few people think Smith deserves the axe for his role in the debacle. There’s no way anyone affiliated with the university wanted something like fans booing to distract from the introduction of the new era of OSU football. It was something so obviously preventable that it baffles me no one threw themselves in front of the train wreck. I guess after the “I just hope he doesn’t dismiss me,” disaster from President E. Gordon Gee following the Jim Tressel-scandal and the litany of bone-head public relations moves that culminated in Tressel’s firing, nothing should surprise me.I just don’t understand how it never occurred to anyone with any say in letting Smith walk to midcourt that “Hey, a lot of people don’t like this Gene Smith guy. Maybe he’ll get booed.”Comically, Smith ignored the boos and tried to drown them out by baiting OSU fans into an “O-H” cheer.Some fans responded, but most continued to steadfastly boo their villain.It wasn’t until Smith finished his introduction that the boo-birds flew away and happily flocked around their newest trophy — Urban Meyer.The cheer was loud and exuberant. Meyer introduced his family and all was back to the plan.But there was one more surprise before the basketball Buckeyes took the floor again.When Meyer introduced Fickell, who is now serving as Meyer’s defensive coordinator, the place went nuts. The positive reaction wasn’t surprising, but the level of it was.Not only was the cheer louder than Meyer’s, but it was the loudest I have ever heard in the Schottenstein Center. People went crazy.Just weeks before, when OSU lost to Michigan for the first time since 2003, people couldn’t wait to show Fickell the door and usher in Meyer to sit on the golden throne of OSU football.Now, Fickell was being revered like he brought the team a national championship.In reality, the fans were showing Fickell gratitude for his handling of an almost impossible situation. He took the OSU job at a time when many would have been afraid.He led the team to a 6-7 record that quite frankly, isn’t good enough for a football program like OSU.OSU fans have a reputation for being arrogant and ruthless, but their outpouring of affection for Fickell showed they have a heart.Sunday’s halftime spectacle put both sides of the average OSU fan on display — the caustic critic and the appreciative spectator.The essence of OSU fans was captured in less than 10 minutes.And it was almost better than a dog catching a Frisbee. read more

Healthy cooking class to improve your holiday diet

first_img November 15, 2018 Healthy cooking class to improve your holiday diet KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)-  If you’re looking to sharpen your culinary skills, improve your diet, and spice up your life, there’s a cooking class just for you! It’s called “Healthy on You.” Amateurs are welcome. Not only will you “up your cooking game” but you’ll also have a lot of fun!This lush tropical paradise in Del Mar is where Samantha Binkley shares her love for cooking and healthy living. Sam, as her friends call her, is a certified health coach who was born in the West Indies. She developed her passion for cooking as a child by watching her mother work her “magic with herbs” in her delicious recipes.Today she’s guiding her class through one of her favorite spots on the one acre property, an amazing garden, filled with lush greenery, lots of gorgeous color, and a vast display of her home grown herbs and vegetables, the essential ingredients in her healthy recipes.And once everything is ripe for the picking, it’s added to her menu.Her exotic chickens are not part of the menu, but they’re great at laying all the eggs and a highlight of the tour.“I love when people are happy, in the kitchen, listening to music and just cooking healthy food. For me, that’s just so rewarding and I just find it a lot of fun,” Binkley said.One of the secrets to Sam’s savory recipes…the more than dozen spices shes created.“I was making spices to cook with during classes, different combos and blends and I would give them to everybody to take home and they would come back and ask for more. And that’s when I knew this is something interesting and I think I can do something great with this,” Binkley said.Her organic spice blends are sold in stores through-out San Diego County. She says her seasonings help make-up for the butter, cream and other “less than healthy” ingredients we add to our recipes. She calls the healing properties of herbs an added benefit.Transforming classic recipes into healthier versions is something many are hungry for. And her monthly classes, which last about 3 hours and cost $125 fill up quickly.“If they don’t make the recipe, at least they have a wider perspective on how they can make foods at home that taste equally good or better with less calories, lower fat and you don’t have to have dairy or gluten and it can still taste great!” Binkley said.To learn more about Samantha Binkley’s cooking classes, visit https://www.sambinkley.com/cooking-classes/ Updated: 9:31 PMcenter_img Posted: November 15, 2018 KUSI Newsroom Categories: Healthy Living, Local San Diego News, Trending FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

SDPD investigate death of 20yearold man in the Fox Canyon neighborhood

first_imgFacebookTwitter SDPD investigate death of 20-year-old man in the Fox Canyon neighborhood KUSI Newsroom Posted: February 3, 2019 Updated: 6:10 PM KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News SAN DIEGO (KUSI)- A man was found dead in a drainage ditch in the Fox Canyon neighborhood this morning, police said. A 911 call came in at 11:30 a.m. reporting a man down in a ditchbehind a home on Auburn Drive near Loris Street, according to San Diego police Lt. Anthony Dupree.Officers and San Diego Fire-Rescue Department personnel quickly arrived and found a man with trauma to his upper body. He was pronounced dead at the scene, Dupree said.Homicide detectives were investigating, but there was no information on any possible suspects.The victim has not yet been identified, but he was described as an Asian man in his 20s.Police asked anyone with information on the man’s death to call SDPD homicide detectives at (619) 531-2293 or San Diego County Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477.Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to call the Homicide Unit at (619) 531-2293 or Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477. February 3, 2019last_img read more

2 motorcyclists killed in Hatirjheel

first_imgThe accident probably took place around 3:00pm, police said, adding that the motorcycle hit a roadside tree, which caused the deaths. Police recovered the bodies in the morning when passersby informed them. The deceased were identified as Hedayetullah, 26, and Habibullah, 25, both diploma engineers. However, the motorcycle belonged to one of the former’s relatives. Hatirjheel. File PhotoTwo motorcyclists were killed in a road accident in the city’s Hatirjheel area early Tuesday.center_img Enayetullah, elder brother of Hedayetullah, said both the deceased had graduated from Cumilla Polytechnic Institute. He said his brother worked for Marium Group while his friend came to Dhaka from Gazipur to look for a job.last_img read more

Search for crashed Indonesia aircraft widens

first_imgA rescue ship is seen near the location of the Lion Air flight JT610 crash during rescue operations off the north coast of Karawang regency. Photo: ReutersThe search for an Indonesian aircraft which crashed into the sea with 189 people onboard will expand on Wednesday to 15 nautical miles from the area where the plane lost contact, according to search and rescue officials.Ground staff lost contact with flight JT610 of Indonesian budget airline Lion Air 13 minutes after the Boeing 737 MAX 8 took off early on Monday from Jakarta on its way to the tin-mining town of Pangkal Pinang.It is now almost certain that everyone on the plane died, but relatives are desperate to find traces of their loved ones though so far only debris and body parts have been found.Indonesia has deployed teams of divers to search for the aircraft while also using “pinger locators” in a bid to zero in on its cockpit recorders and find out why an almost-new plane went down in the sea minutes after take off.A Reuters witness on a boat at the crash site on Tuesday saw about 60 divers scattered in inflatable boats over the slightly choppy waters entering the sea, which is about 35 metres (115 feet) deep. In all, 35 vessels are helping in the search.Only debris, personal items, including 52 identification cards and passports, and body parts have been found off the shore of Karawang district, east of Jakarta.President Joko Widodo visited Jakarta’s port on Tuesday where the pile of debris has been laid out on tarpaulins, examining the items including mangled seats, bags, shoes and flight attendant uniforms.Officials said human remains were collected in 37 body bags after sweeps of the site, roughly 15 km (nine miles) off the coast.Dozens of relatives of those on board gathered at a police hospital where body bags were brought for forensic doctors to try to identify victims, including by taking saliva swabs from family members for DNA tests.“I keep praying for a miracle although logically, the plane has sunk in the ocean,” said Toni Priyono Adhi, whose daughter was on the flight.“But as a parent, I want a miracle.”The pilot of the downed aircraft had asked to return to base shortly after take-off. Investigators are trying to determine why the pilot issued the request, which was granted.The deputy of the national transportation safety committee has said that the plane had technical problems on its previous flight, from the city of Denpasar on Bali island on Sunday, including an issue over “unreliable airspeed”.The accident is the first to be reported involving the widely sold Boeing 737 MAX, an updated, more fuel-efficient version of the manufacturer’s workhorse single-aisle jet.Privately owned Lion Air, founded in 1999, said the aircraft, which had been in operation since August, was airworthy, with its pilot and co-pilot together having amassed 11,000 hours of flying time.Lion Air said on Tuesday it would meet a team from Boeing on Wednesday to discuss the fate of its 737 MAX 8 plane that crashed into the sea minutes after takeoff from Jakarta airport. “We have many questions for them … This was a new plane,” Lion Air director Daniel Putut told reporters.last_img read more

New StateFunded Sensors Are Tracking Earthquakes Across Texas

first_imgA new interactive website from state-funded researchers is tracking tremors across Texas – part of an effort to understand the link between earthquakes and oil and gas production.Three years ago, a series of quakes rattled North Texas — and some residents’ nerves.Larry Walden, a Parker County commissioner, remembers a public meeting at the time in which residents complained about cracked houses, damaged foundations and even a hen that had stopped laying eggs.“They were minor earthquakes unless you’re in an area affected by it,” Walden said. “Then it’s not minor.”So when a state-funded research team approached the county a year and a half ago about installing a sensor to track seismic activity on a piece of farmland, “we were more than happy,” Walden said. Local officials were eager for “some outside agency to … hopefully give us some feedback as to what was going on.”That sensor, installed last year, is just one node in a statewide network called TexNet that monitors quakes and tremors across Texas. Run out of the University of Texas at Austin’s Bureau of Economic Geology, the program was created by the Legislature and Gov. Greg Abbott in 2015 after a series of temblors shook the Dallas-Fort Worth region.Texas saw an uptick in quakes starting in 2008, and a growing body of research has linked fossil fuel activities – specifically the injection of oilfield wastewater into the ground – to the shaking. Industry representatives and state regulators have been wary of acknowledging a connection, arguing more detailed information is needed.That’s where the TexNet Seismic Monitoring program comes in. The goal is for the network of sensors, now collecting data across the state, to suss out the source of the tremors.“You have a very complex issue, and a lot of people have tried to oversimplify it,” said Steve Everley, a spokesman for the industry-funded group Texans for Natural Gas. “We need to get good data; we need to have good research. This is a program that obviously leads us toward that goal.”Peter Hennings, a research scientist with UT-Austin’s Bureau of Economic Geology, said initial TexNet data shows “earthquakes happening in key areas in Texas that have really been known about for a few years” – mainly hubs of oil and gas production. As the program amasses more data, “we’ll be able to start to look at the earthquake rate and ask the question, ‘Is it increasing or decreasing in a given area?’” he said. “We’re moving pretty swiftly in the direction of being able to provide answers.”A “vexed relationship”Scientists have long established that injecting fluid deep underground – a technique used to dispose of oilfield wastewater – can trigger earthquakes. And in recent years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and researchers at Texas universities have pointed to the wastewater disposal process as a likely culprit behind shaking in the state.Cliff Frohlich, a senior research scientist at the University of Texas at Austin who has studied seismicity for decades, said “some companies in [the] industry have been very forward-looking about getting some of their best people working on this,” while “others have stuck their heads in the sand or been very secretive.”The Texas Railroad Commission, the state’s oil and gas regulator, also has seemed to have a “vexed relationship” with the issue, Frohlich said. The commission has panned much of the research linking quakes to oil and gas activities. But in 2014, the agency approved regulations requiring disposal well operators to submit more geographical information and hired a staff seismologist.“There’s been, I’d say, a difference between their sort of public face on that and their activities,” Frohlich said.The regulations allow for permits to be amended or wells shut down due to seismicity. Since they took effect, the commission has received 114 disposal well applications in “areas of historic seismicity,” said Ramona Nye, a spokeswoman for the commission, in an emailed statement. Of those, 60 were issued with special conditions, including some related to injection volumes and pressure. Another 15 of the applications were returned or withdrawn.“The commission has long recognized the possibility of induced seismicity related to fluid injection; that’s why the [commission] has in place some of the most stringent rules in the nation to address the issue,” she said.Everley, the Texans for Natural Gas spokesman, credited the Railroad Commission’s regulatory overhaul with a subsequent decline in earthquakes in the state. In a risk assessment for 2017, the U.S. Geological Survey said the odds that a manmade earthquake would hit Texas this year had plummeted. The year before, the state was pegged as the third-most at-risk for them, behind only Oklahoma and Kansas.But Luke Metzger, the director of the advocacy group Environment Texas, said that the oil and gas industry – backed by government regulators – continues to downplay the link between quakes and disposal wells. There’s already a “body of science,” he said; officials should now be taking steps to reduce the risk, such as recycling fracking water instead of injecting it into the ground.“Better data, better information”While the Railroad Commission oversees more than 8,000 deep disposal wells in Texas, Hennings said “just a tiny number of that 8,000″ have been associated with earthquakes. TexNet’s role is not “to try to pin individual wells as problems,” he said. “We’re looking at the process.”The TexNet program’s creation in 2015 came with a $4.5 million infusion from the state. With it, program leaders were able to buy dozens of seismometers – devices that monitor earthquakes – and bring on a team of researchers to wrangle the collected data into useable insight.Two years later, the program has placed a grid of those sensors across the state. An interactive website that went live in October streams data from those monitoring stations to show every quake with a magnitude of 1.5 or greater.Alexandros Savvaidis, a research scientist at the Bureau of Economic Geology, spent months meeting with landowners  and scouting out possible sites for the sensors, which track when and how much the ground shakes.“We had 18 stations before TexNet,” Savvaidis said, referencing seismometers operated by Southern Methodist University researchers and the U.S. Geological Survey, a federal agency that generally tracks earthquakes with a magnitude of 2.5 and greater.“Now, in 2017, we have almost another 60” monitoring stations in the state, Savvaidis said. Permanent stations are spread evenly across the state like a backbone, Savvaidis said, while temporary stations have been deployed to places that reported seismic activity in recent years, including the oil-rich Permian Basin.“The new network will give us the possibility to work more on the seismicity – to have better data, better information, that will help us understand this phenomenon,” he said.Todd Staples, president of the Texas Oil & Gas Association, an industry trade group, said the Legislature was smart to fund the TexNet program. Petroleum industry groups have also contributed more than $1 million to related research efforts.“The data being produced is a good resource for academia and industry,” Staples said in a statement. “All Texans benefit from good, science-based research.”Frohlich said seismicity research in Texas can be divided into two eras: pre- and post-TexNet. If the program continues to be funded, he said, it’s “going to be a huge change in the way earthquake activity can be met, managed and analyzed.” “I can’t say we’ve solved the induced earthquake problem,” he said, “but we know a lot of things that we didn’t know before.” Sharelast_img read more

Sunnyside Activists Claim Election Judge Tried To Suppress Voter Outreach

first_img 00:00 /00:47 Share X Listen – / 5Cynthia Pharms said she has advocated for candidates outside the Sunnyside Multi-Service Center for 20 years, but this is the first time an election judge told her she couldn’t be there.“She’s been telling us we cannot push right here on this sidewalk, which is city property,” Pharms said.She called elected officials, including U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee and state Sen. Borris Miles.Miles released a statement condemning the election judge, Bonnie Parker, and blaming a Republican effort to suppress Democratic votes in light of a record turnout in Harris County Democratic primary elections.“We knew that in the midst of a national campaign to keep President Trump into office and his cohorts into office, we knew that the Voting Rights Act was under attack,” Miles’ spokesman, Justin Concepcion, said.Assistant Harris County Attorney Douglas Ray visited Sunnyside Friday after receiving complaints.“It was a misunderstanding with the judge that I don’t think has worked at this location before and didn’t understand how this traditionally was done,” he said.The Harris County Clerk’s Office said technically, the 100-feet distance marker for those advocating for candidates and issues would have to be beyond the sidewalk, but they’re making an exception so people don’t have to stand on the street.Sonya Aston, administrator of elections for Harris County, said after talking to Parker, the election judge, campaigners are now also allowed behind a marker on the parking lot of the Sunnyside Multi-Service Center.“The campaign people have now a safer place to go, if they choose to, inside the fence that they didn’t have access to beforehand,” Aston said. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Over 5K participate in awareness drive against Thalassemia

first_imgKolkata: Over 5,000 people took part in a signature campaign as a part of the awareness drive against Thalassemia on World Thalassemia Day. The campaign was organised by Medical Bank. The signatories included people from all walks of life. Leaflets were distributed as a part of the campaign. Workshops and seminars were held on Thalassemia to celebrate the World Thalassemia Day.There are 40,000 Thalassemia patients in Bengal while the number of carriers will be over one lakh. There is no treatment for the disease and awareness is very important. The state government has over and again requested young people to get their blood tested before marriage to control spread of the disease. It is a well-known fact that Amitabh Bachchan is a Thalassemia carrier, while his spouse Jaya is not a carrier. Hence, none of their children Abhishek and Sweta are suffering from the disease. D Ashis, secretary of Medical Bank, said awareness to check the spread of the disease is important as the disease is fast growing. Thalassemia patients need blood and in summer when there is a crisis of blood or if they have negative blood group the problem is doubled.On the occasion, CM Mamata Banerjee tweeted: “Today is World Thalassaemia Day. My best wishes to all those fighting the disease: patients, doctors and caregivers.”last_img read more

Ecigarettes may cause wheezing in adults

first_imgPeople who use electronic cigarette are nearly twice as likely to experience wheezing compared to those who do not regularly use tobacco products, a study has found. Wheezing, which is caused by narrowed or abnormal airways, is often a precursor to other serious health conditions such as emphysema, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, heart failure, lung cancer and sleep apnea. The findings, published in the journal Tobacco Control, are consistent with past research that shows emissions from electronic cigarette aerosols and flavourings damage lung cells by generating harmful free radicals and inflammation in lung tissue. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The take-home message is that electronic cigarettes are not safe when it comes to lung health,” said Deborah J Ossip, a professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) in the US. Electronic cigarettes are extremely popular in the US Data from the National Center for Health Statistics indicates that close to 13 per cent of US adults have tried electronic cigarettes and nearly 4 percent currently use them. Although electronic cigarettes are marketed as a less harmful alternative to cigarette smoking, many concerns remain related to the long-term health consequences of vaping. Researchers from URMC analysed data from more than 28,000 adults in the US who took part in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. After adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and other factors, adult vapers were 1.7 times more likely to experience wheezing.last_img read more

Dean Possenniskie Pay TV channel provider AE Netw

first_imgDean PossenniskiePay TV channel provider A+E Networks has recently been branching out into the free-to-air world, notably with the launch of Blaze in the UK. EMEA managing director Dean Possenniskie talked to Stuart Thomson about the company’s changing profile.While the demise of pay TV has been greatly exaggerated, the business is reaching maturity in many developed markets and channel providers are searching for new avenues to growth – either by launching a direct-to-consumer digital offering, or a free-to-air linear channel.A+E Networks has delved into the free-to-air market in EMEA in a significant way with the launch of male-focused Blaze in the UK. The group also entered the Turkish market with a free-to-air version of Lifetime in April in partnership with local player MCD Media. According to Dean Possenniskie, managing director, A+E Networks EMEA, taking the plunge into free-to-air in a strong pay TV market like the UK made sense because there was an opportunity to use A+E’s content without damaging its pay TV business or threaten distribution partnerships. “We were fortunate that with the A+E pipeline of content we could go different ways. We have strong distribution partnerships and we continue to grow our channels,” says Possenniskie. “We value our partnerships highly. Blaze is complementary in terms of windowing, scheduling and the brand, and can be used to cross-promote to content on pay TV like Pawn Stars on History.”In addition to launching Blaze as a linear channel, A+E has used the launch to debut its first TV Everywhere service in EMEA, providing access to Blaze content on a catch-up basis on multiple screens. Possenniskie is clear that A+E is not diluting its commitment to pay TV and points out that the company also has a strong business supplying content to free-to-air broadcasters. “We have to think very carefully about what is the best avenue for us,” he says. “Internally, we don’t qualify our brands as being defined by platform. It’s really about where we feel the opportunity is.” Similarly, whether to go it alone, as in the UK with Blaze, or with a partner, as in Turkey, will depend on whether A+E has a strong existing presence in a particular market.The key in either case, says Possenniskie, is to analyse the market and plan the launch carefully. “In the UK we spent time on looking at the market and the content offering and the brand. It has to take some time. It is important to get it right,” he says. For the launch of Blaze, A+E tapped the TVPlayer platform, for which it has now led a £5 million investment round (e5.7 million). “We always look for new opportunities to develop new digital technologies and services and TVPlayer was looking for a strategic partner,” says Possenniskie. Aside from free-to-air, the other main non-core opportunity that channel providers have addressed is digital platforms that can be made available either to pay TV customers only or as a direct-to-consumer service, either free-to-view or as a subscription offering. A+E has taken the plunge into digital in the US with the launch of Lifetime Movie Network and History Vault. Possenniskie says that History Vault is seen as a key opportunity in EMEA. He is agnostic about whether such a service should be rolled out as a standalone offering or part of a joint effort with pay TV partners, adding that it could be rolled out in different markets either as a direct-to-consumer offering or via pay TV partners. “Aside from supporting our platform partners with non-linear content, we are looking at building a standalone SVOD product that can add something to the platform,” says Possenniskie. “We keep an open mind on what model would work best in which market.” For both free-to-air linear channels and non-linear digital direct-to-consumer services, having a compelling pipeline of content remains key. For A+E this has also gone hand-in-hand with diversifying its content line-up to embrace more scripted as well as unscripted content. The development of A+E Studios in the US has been key to this. Content developed by the in-house production unit has been aired on Lifetime and History. For Possenniskie, while drama and movies have been core to Lifetime, the real opportunity is to add scripted content to History, with Vikings and, more recently, its remake of the groundbreaking 1977 mini-series Roots, standing out as examples of content that can enhance the profile of the channel. Roots is currently set to premiere in Italy on History. And for all the recent focus on the free-to-air market with the launch of Blaze, A+E continues to populate pay TV platforms with its portfolio of services including History, H2, A&E, CI and Lifetime. Possenniskie says that there continues to be strong opportunities for pay TV launches in EMEA, notably in Africa, where the programmer now has an established presence in Johannesburg.“Our optimal presence is to have four to six brands in each market in pay TV. If you have only two brands, such as History and CI, there may be potential to launch Lifetime or FYI or whatever. In terms of whether to go for pay TV versus free-to-air, it is hard to have a cookie-cutter approach, but some markets will support a full portfolio of services.”last_img read more

The next great insect repellent might come from a

first_imgThe next great insect repellent might come from a strain of bacteria that lives inside a common parasitic worm. A study published Wednesday in Science Advances has found that a compound derived from these bacteria is three times more potent than DEET in repelling mosquitoes. More research must be done to demonstrate its safety, but this bacterial chemical could play an important role in the fight against mosquito-borne illness.Susan Paskewitz, a professor of entomology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who oversaw the study, explains that the project started in the lab of her late colleague, Que Lan. She and her student Il-Hwan Kim were studying bacteria called Xenorhabdus budapestensis, which lives inside the tiny roundworms called nematodes. These nematodes parasitize insects in the soil, sneaking into their bodies and releasing hordes of Xenorhabdus, which soon kill the insect. Then, without the insect’s immune system to contend with, the nematodes devour the carcass and multiply.According to Paskewitz, Lan wanted to crack Xenorhabdus’ insecticidal code in hopes that it might lead to a novel mosquito killer. She put the bacteria into the artificial blood supply she feeds to her mosquito colonies, hoping they would ingest the bacteria and she could track whether the mosquitoes were harmed. But her mosquitoes wouldn’t go anywhere near the treated blood, much less ingest it. “The mosquitoes would die from drying out rather than touch the thing,” says Paskewitz. That observation stuck in Paskewitz’s mind, suggesting that something produced by these bacteria make might be useful as an insect repellent.Since the 1940s, the chemical DEET has been our first line of defense against mosquitoes. It’s still the most effective repellent we have. But DEET has its problems. One is stigma. “As a public health entomologist, I believe that DEET is an effective and safe product to use [the EPA agrees], but I do know that some consumers are concerned about synthetic chemicals,” says Paskewitz. “Whether those concerns are founded in evidence may be beside the point. What matters from my perspective is that people don’t have a barrier to using repellents, so that in the event of the next Zika or West Nile virus outbreak, we’re prepared.” DEET also needs to be reapplied often, which can leave people exposed if they forget. And at high concentrations, DEET can melt plastic, making it difficult to imbue DEET into clothing that could be worn for longer-lasting protection.What’s more, DEET’s effectiveness may not be permanent, according to Silvie Huijben, an evolutionary biologist and disease ecologist at Arizona State University. “There is some evidence that resistance to DEET can evolve in mosquito populations, and mosquitoes can also learn to overcome their aversion to DEET,” she says. Because living populations can evolve in response to single interventions, it’s best tackle the problem from many angles. “In that sense, there is a void to be filled,” Huijben says.To see if Xenorhabdus could fill that void, Paskewitz and her collaborator Mayur Kajla first had to isolate the potential repellent from everything else the bacteria produces. To home in on the active compound, Kajla isolated smaller and smaller components of a sort of bacterial soup and tested whether each mixture repelled mosquitoes.Kajla explains that since we don’t yet know whether this substance is toxic, scientists can’t just slather a subject’s arm in Xenorhabdus, stick it into a swarm of mosquitoes and see if they bite. So instead, he put a mixture of mosquito food – basically, fake blood dyed red — inside a skin-like sausage casing membrane. He soaked cheesecloth in the bacterial soup and layered it over this casing. Then, mosquitoes had 30 minutes to feed, after which the researchers counted how many mosquitoes were engorged with red bellies. The better the repellent, the fewer red bellies. Eventually Kajla identified the repellent compound that the bacteria secreted. Chemical analysis revealed it to be part of a class of chemicals known as fabclavines. With the repellent identified, Kajla then used the same setup to see how it fared against existing repellents. “We were surprised at how well the bacterial repellent worked,” says Kajla. You’d need three times as much DEET and eight times as much picaridin, another effective repellent, to repel the same percentage of insects.The researchers varied the concentration of the fabclavine mixture and observed that at lower concentrations, most mosquitoes landed on the feeding apparatus, but only about half fed. This suggests that, at low concentrations of the mixture, mosquitoes are repelled by the taste, but not the smell. By contrast, almost no mosquitoes landed and none fed when there were higher concentrations of the chemical, suggesting the mosquitoes were repelled by the smell alone. Kajla says, “at this point we don’t know how the deterrent is affecting mosquitoes, but it could be both taste and smell.””This is a really exciting result,” says Matthew DeGennaro, a neurogeneticist at Florida International University who studies mosquito genetics and was not involved in the study. “DEET is almost like magic, and we don’t find things that work as well as it does everyday.” DeGennaro also raised the possibility that the mosquitoes’ repulsion might be an innate, adaptive strategy to avoid getting anywhere near the deadly Xenorhabdus that harbor the compound. More work needs to be done before you can douse yourself in this bacterial concoction and head into the woods with abandon. According to Paskewitz, fabclavines may be difficult to chemically synthesize at scale. But “bacterial fermentation, which is used to produce the widely used insecticide Bt could work for fabclavines,” Paskewitz says.According to Huijben, the broader fight against mosquito-borne disease is changing, and repellents may play an increasingly important role. In the case of malaria, which she studies, mosquito populations are adapting around once effective measures. Bed nets proved effective in preventing the transmission of malaria via mosquitoes, which historically happened during evening hours when mosquitoes fed. But Huijben says mosquitoes are evolving to feed outside during the daytime, when their food source isn’t safely snoozing under a net. If fabclavine proves safe, effective and practical for human use, the ancient methods of the roundworm and its bacterial partners in crime could prove to be the latest weapon in the race to ward off mosquitoes.Jonathan Lambert is an intern on NPR’s Science Desk. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Entrepreneur Media Forms Strategic Partnership With AlleyNYC

first_img 3 min read Entrepreneur Add to Queue Image credit: Jason Saltzman Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business –shares Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Next Article Register Now » Entrepreneur Media Forms Strategic Partnership With AlleyNYC Ryan Shea Collaboration is key to any entrepreneurial pursuit. Yes, entrepreneurs are loners and self-starters, but most successful businesspeople will tell you they fostered their idea or company with the help of the feedback and advice of their peers.It is in the spirit of this collaboration that I’m so pleased to announce Entrepreneur Media has invested in and is partnering with AlleyNYC, one of America’s most dynamic shared-space working environments.Take a walk through AlleyNYC’s offices and you will see American entrepreneurship at its finest. Innovators turning their ideas into sustainable businesses sit with one another, share ideas and brainstorm. Companies there hire their first employees and make the move from shared workstations up to offices. Eventually many outgrow the space itself, making room for the next company to invest in their own success and move up the chain.Along the way, there are wins and losses. Companies fail, while others are acquired or enjoy healthy rounds of venture-capital funding. Through it all, these experiences are shared by all the members of AlleyNYC’s community. Like the broader entrepreneurial community, the professionals working alongside one another at AlleyNYC are a family.Entrepreneur Media is now a big part of that family. Through our strategic relationship, Entrepreneur exclusively will be able to tell the stories of the companies that use AlleyNYC to help grow their businesses. We will share those experiences with you, our audience, through digital media, video, print and books. You will experience the highs and lows of the startup world, learning from failures and celebrating in successes.The startup community has always been the heart and soul of Entrepreneur Media. Over more than three decades, we have chronicled the booms and busts of Silicon Valley, the development of areas like New York and Austin as technology hubs and the rise of the Internet as a means to enrich our lives — and a pathway to create thousands of new businesses. Companies like Google and eBay and Facebook started as ideas in the minds of risk-takers and innovators. Now, with AlleyNYC, we can watch a new generation of companies get off the ground, and give our audience a unique view on the opportunities and challenges facing startups today.We will also offer joint Entrepreneur-AlleyNYC events, bringing the rich history of our organization to the exciting energy that AlleyNYC has come to be known for. There will be opportunities for exclusive face-to-face networking events melding the communities of Entrepreneur Media and AlleyNYC.Crucially, this investment allows us to fund AlleyNYC’s expanison, helping to give it the same global reach as Entrepreneur.Culturally, this investment and partnership is a perfect fit. Jason Saltzman, AlleyNYC’s founder, has boundless energy and is an entrepreneur in his own right. He has praised our company, our employees and our audience by calling Entrepreneur the most relevant publication out there today. Separately, we are powerful brands in the startup community. Together, the sky’s the limit in what we can accomplish.Look for more information in the coming weeks about this partnership. Entrepreneur Media has the best audience in news – educated and driven, thinkers, dreamers, and doers. That’s you. Now, with our investment in AlleyNYC, we can ensure we are providing even better content and more opportunities to help you grow your own businesses and contribute to the continued story of the American Dream. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. June 3, 2014 CEO, Entrepreneur Media, Inc.last_img read more

DirectLync Shakes Up Small Business Marketing with New Digital Marketing Platform

first_imgThe New Platform Brings Together All the Essential Sales and Marketing Tools in One Place, Changing the Way Businesses Use Marketing TechnologyDirectLync announces the launch of its digital marketing platform for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). The platform’s integrated approach to digital marketing brings together all the essential tools – contact management, email marketing, social media management, website CMS, and reporting and insights – into one easy-to-use platform, saving users over 14 hours a month in efforts managing data from different sources. The all-in-one platform is aimed to help SMBs easily execute their sales and marketing activities and get a more holistic view into their channel performance.DirectLync is founded on the principle that custom design and integrated technology solutions should not be limited to enterprise corporations. The US Small Business Association says there are 30.2 million small business in the US. The platform offers these businesses a more affordable alternative to current enterprise solutions.Marketing Technology News: New Platform from Parabolt Helps Retailers Capture The “Magic Moment” of Sales“The siloed approach to marketing is a painful and time-consuming experience for SMBs,” said Kevin Lynch, President and Founder of DirectLync. “Many sales and marketing teams are using multiple platforms to manage digital efforts or skipping out on digital marketing because of time constraints. Analyzing reports and attributing success to campaigns is nearly impossible. SMBs are an impactful part of our global economy, and they need to be equipped with easy-to-use, affordable, and integrated solutions.”Marketing Technology News: Regions Bank Taps IBM’s AI to Power Next Generation Customer ServiceAccording to a Capital One Spark Business survey of small business owners, 76 percent of owners face marketing challenges, and 64 percent feel they’re unable to effectively market their businesses the way they’d like to. DirectLync helps solve this problem by providing them with the tools they need to perform and track marketing and sales initiatives across channels.DirectLync offers a 30-day free trial and four different pricing tiers starting at just $20 per month. In 2019, they plan to introduce expanded features and new tools to the platform.Marketing Technology News: Huawei Enables Smart Finance with “AI+DATA” DirectLync Shakes Up Small Business Marketing with New Digital Marketing Platform PRNewswireApril 30, 2019, 6:17 pmApril 30, 2019 digital marketing platformDirectLyncemail marketingMarketing Technology NewsNewsSocial Media ManagementSpark Business survey Previous ArticleVideo Conferencing Equipment Supplier, IVCi, Lists and Explains How Small Businesses Can Benefit from Video ConferencingNext ArticleTray.io Raises $37 Million Series B Funding to Usher in the Era of The Automated Enterpriselast_img read more

Women in low and middleincome countries need radiotherapy to treat their cervical

first_img Source:University Health Network These are women in their prime who are working, caring for children, and contributing to their communities. We have made huge progress in tackling other infectious disease and in reducing maternal mortality, so that women are now living long enough to develop diseases such as cancer and heart disease.Vaccination is hugely important, but we can’t neglect the millions of women who are contracting cervical cancer and dying in pain without access to treatment. These are women who have curable cancers – even advanced cervical cancer can be cured with radiotherapy. The possibility exists to make this treatment universally available.”Dr. Danielle Rodin, Clinician-Investigator and Radiation Oncologist, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 29 2019A first of its kind study is reporting that millions of women in low- and middle-income countries will need life-saving radiotherapy to treat their cervical cancer, despite the growth of essential human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination prevention programs.The availability of radiotherapy in these regions would generate millions of productive life years and billions of dollars in economic benefits for their families and communities.The study modeled the long-term demand, benefit and cost of implementing a 20-year strategy for radiotherapy to treat cervical cancer in low- and middle-income countries between 2015 and 2035, alongside a simultaneous vaccination program.Low-income and middle-income countries include those with a gross national income of less than $12,000 USD a year.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerThe research entitled “Scale-up of radiotherapy for cervical cancer in the era of human papillomavirus vaccination in low-income and middle-income countries: A model-based analysis of need and economic impact,” by lead author Dr. Danielle Rodin and senior author Dr. Michael Milosevic, in the Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre is published in the May 24, 2019 online edition of The Lancet Oncology.In the designated 20-year-time span, the study estimated that 9.4 million women in these countries will require radiotherapy – the gold standard for curing women with more advanced cervical cancer. This would result in a net benefit to the economies of these countries of $151.5 billion over the same time period as a direct result of women living longer, more productive lives.HPV vaccination would result in a 3.9% reduction in cervical cancer incidence over the study period – assuming a best case scenario of vaccinating every 12-year-old girl in the world starting in 2014. By 2072, when the first vaccinated cohort reaches 70 years of age, there would be a 22.9% reduction in incidence, still leaving 41.6 million in need for radiotherapy over that time period.Almost all cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection. There are more than 100 types of HPV, of which more than 40 can cause cervical cancer. Persistent HPV infections can sometimes develop into cervical cancer if not treated.last_img read more