Saint Calvados forced to miss weekend return | Racing News

first_imgThe Sparsholt handler has not ruled out running Saint Calvados over three miles for the first time in the Ladbrokes King George VI Chase at Kempton on Boxing Day.He added: “We want to make sure he is okay first before running. Hopefully he will be back in a few days but he will probably need a couple of easy weeks before we can get on with him.“He is in the King George and whether that rules him out of that I’m not sure, but that will be Andrew’s decision. Hopefully all being well, we should have him for the second half of the season.”An outing in the Grade Two Desert Orchid Chase at Kempton could be on the agenda for Rouge Vif after he was taken out of Sunday’s Shloer Chase at Cheltenham due to the soft ground.Whittington added: “It doesn’t really make sense running him on that ground at Cheltenham as it will be proper hard work in those conditions so we will wait for better ground.“What we go for next I’m not sure, Andrew will have the final say. He is in the Tingle Creek but it is likely to be soft ground there.“The Desert Orchid at Kempton is more likely as he always runs well at that meeting as he has been runner-up there two years in a row.”Plans remain fluid for Simply The Betts, who suffered only his second defeat over fences when finishing sixth in the Paddy Power Gold Cup.He added: “He made an error at the water and he just lost his confidence a little bit after that. Gavin (Sheehan) said he galloped home really strongly.“He has come out of it fine but we will just let the dust settle before we decide what to do next. We will discuss things over the next few days as there is no rush to make a decision.” Last season’s Ryanair Chase runner-up was being readied to make his return to action next Saturday in either the Betfair Chase at Haydock or the Chanelle Pharma 1965 Chase at Ascot on the same day.Whittington said: “Saint Calvados has a bit of septicaemia from an infection. We found he had the infection and a high temperature last night during evening stables.“We are not sure where the infection came from. There is a small overreach but we are not sure it is that as it could be a pin prick somewhere.- Advertisement – “As a precaution we have sent him to the Donnington Grove Equine Vets. He will spend a few days there as it is the best place for him.“They can get on top of the infection and if there is anything else untowards they have the resources to find it.“It means he will not be running next weekend, which is frustrating as he did a lovely piece of work. “- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Saint Calvados faces a spell on the sidelines due to a bout of blood poisoning following an infection.The Andrew and Kate Brooks-owned seven-year-old has been sent to the Donnington Grove Equine Vets, near Newbury, after trainer Harry Whittington discovered the setback on Saturday.- Advertisement –last_img read more

I’d ‘Leave’ If I Saw Prince William, Harry

first_imgIn season 4 of The Crown, which dropped on Netflix on Sunday, November 14, Corrin portrays Diana between the ages of 16 and 28 — following her meeting Prince Charles, getting married, having sons and the start of the marriage falling apart.“She has no idea what she’s getting involved with,” the actress says of Diana at that point in her life. “And it was more exciting to play that, because you are showing sides of somebody people don’t know.”Prince Harry and Prince William arrive for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle The Crown Emma Corrin Says She Would Leave If She Saw Prince William and Prince Harry at a PartyPrince Harry and Prince William arrive for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in Windsor, Berkshire, UK on May 19, 2018. ShutterstockThe England native noted that she really enjoyed acting in the early scenes “when her fashion sense was awful,” over the scenes that covered the more publicized moments of Diana’s life — like her solo trip to New York City in 1989, which was chronicled during the finale.- Advertisement – Unfortunately, Corrin will only star as the Princess of Wales for one season as Elizabeth Debicki will step into the role for the last two seasons of the series.“It’s a shame,” she told the magazine. “I’m sad about it. But I’ve moved on.”The Crown is now streaming on Netflix.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! A bit curious! Emma Corrin, who portrays a young Princess Diana on season 4 of The Crown, is curious to hear what the royal family thinks of the show — but knows it wouldn’t be easy for them to watch.“I can’t imagine,” Corrin, 24, told British GQ when asked how she thinks Prince William and Prince Harry would feel about the show. “I’m not going to say it doesn’t matter, because that would be ignorant. If someone made a programme about my grandma, who died last year, that would be difficult for me to watch.”Emma Corrin as Princess Diana and Josh OConnor as Prince Charles in season 4 of The Crown The Crown Emma Corrin Says She Would Leave If She Saw Prince William and Prince Harry at a PartyEmma Corrin as Princess Diana and Josh O’Connor as Prince Charles in season 4 of ‘The Crown’ Des Willie/Netflix- Advertisement – The actress then noted that she is “interested to know what they think,” but would never ask. “If I ever saw them at a party, I’d probably leave!”William, 38, does not watch the show, according to Olivia Coleman, who portrays his grandmother in seasons 3 and 4.“I was so excited and asked, ‘Have you watched it?’” she revealed on The Graham Norton Show last year. “His answer was a firm, ‘No.’ But he was very charming and very lovely!”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Trump Plan to Sell Arctic Oil Leases Will Face Challenges

first_imgUnder new leadership, several federal agencies could reject the leases, which even if purchased at an auction a few days before Inauguration Day would be subject to review, a process that usually takes several months.Mr. Biden vowed during the campaign to oppose oil and gas development in the refuge, a vast expanse of virtually untouched land in northeast Alaska that is home to polar bears, caribou and other wildlife. Even if in its waning days the Trump administration succeeds in selling oil and gas leases in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, the leases may never be issued, legal and other experts said Tuesday.The leases would face strong and likely insurmountable headwinds from two directions: the incoming Biden administration and the courts, they said.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Fourth vCJD case linked with blood transfusion in UK

first_img Variant CJD is the human counterpart of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, which spread through British cattle herds in the 1980s and 1990s. Most vCJD patients are believed to have acquired the fatal brain disease by eating beef from diseased cattle. See also: The United Kingdom uses a number of precautions to protect the blood supply from vCJD infectivity, the HPA noted. Since 1997, new cases of vCJD have triggered a search for and destruction of any blood donated by the case-patient. Since 1998 the United Kingdom has used blood plasma from the United States to produce all plasma derivatives. And since October 1999, white blood cells, which may pose the greatest risk of transmitting vCJD, have been removed from blood used for transfusions. Jan 18 UK HPA news releasehttp://www.hpa.org.uk/hpa/news/articles/press_releases/2007/070118_vCJD.htm Jan 22, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Health officials in the United Kingdom have found a probable fourth case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) associated with a blood transfusion from someone who unknowingly had the disease. Authorities have classified the new case as probable, since vCJD cannot be definitively diagnosed until after death. Postmortem studies have been done on 112 of the 158 vCJD case-patients who have died, and have confirmed the disease in all cases, the HPA said. The case was diagnosed in a patient who received blood 9 years ago from a person who later was found to have vCJD, the UK Health Protection Agency (HPA) said in a Jan 18 statement. All 23 people have previously been informed of their potential exposure to the disease and advised to take precautions to reduce the risk of passing it to others via healthcare procedures, such as surgery, the statement said. “A transfusion from the same blood donor was also associated with one of the previously identified cases,” the HPA said. “The patient is still alive and is under specialist care.” “This new case of vCJD infection increases our concern about the risk to the small group of people who had blood transfusions from donors who unknowingly at the time of donation must have had vCJD infection,” Peter Borrielo, director of the HPA Centre for Infections, said in the news release. “However, this new case does not change our understanding of the risk for other people in any specific way.” The first case of vCJD associated with a blood transfusion was found in December 2003. So far, authorities have identified 66 people in the United Kingdom who have received “vCJD-implicated” transfusions, of whom 40 have died of causes other than vCJD, the HPA said. Twenty-three people are alive and have not been diagnosed with vCJD. Jul 22, 2004, CIDRAP News story “Another UK patient may have caught vCJD from blood” Sep 24, 2004, CIDRAP News story “UK tells blood-product recipients about possible vCJD risk”last_img read more

Experts to discuss swine flu vaccine decision May 14

first_img See also: “We are well aware and are not hiding the fact that manufacturers have agreements with a number of governments to provide access to a vaccine,” she said. “We are discussing with the manufacturers where they are in terms of filling up their books . . . and what may still be available. Some vaccine may still be available in the early weeks or months of production.” The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other WHO collaborating centers are developing seed strains of virus for use in H1N1 vaccines. “We expect these will be available to manufacturers most likely in the second half of May,” Kieny said. The decision whether to recommend production will depend on the accumulating epidemiologic evidence about the virus, including how much of the population is likely to get sick and how severe the illness is, she said. And if the recommendation is made, it will be up to the manufacturers to decide whether to go ahead. WHO press briefings on swine fluhttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/multimedia/swineflupressbriefings/en/index.html The officials will discuss the potential procurement by agencies such as the United Nations Children’s Fund and the Pan American Health Organization of vaccine for developing countries, she said. “The decision is not that of WHO; the decision will be the manufacturers’ to take,” she said. In other comments, Kieny reported that the WHO director-general and the secretary-general of the United Nations will meet with vaccine company executives on May 19 to discuss how to ensure “equitable access for all countries” to any H1N1 vaccine. Last week Kieny said some of the vaccine manufacturers had completed about 60% of their production of the seasonal flu vaccine and that WHO officials were talking with them about the best time to switch from making seasonal vaccine to a swine flu vaccine. Kieny was asked if any vaccine would be available for poor countries, given that a number of governments have contracts with manufacturers for large amounts of any pandemic vaccine produced. In addition, no one yet knows what size dose will be necessary, whether an adjuvant will be needed, and whether each person will need one dose or two, Kieny reported. “Being conservative, we think there’ll be at least between 1 and 2 billion doses,” she said. May 6, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) will convene a group of experts May 14 to advise the agency on whether to pull the trigger on production of a vaccine for the novel H1N1 swine influenza virus, a WHO official announced today. Kieny also acknowledged that multiple unknowns will govern how many doses can be produced and how many will be needed. For one thing, most of the vaccine will have to be grown in eggs—cell-based flu vaccine production is not mature enough to make much of a contribution—and no one knows how well the vaccine virus will grow in eggs, she said.center_img May 1 CIDRAP News story “Path to swine flu vaccine has major hurdles” Kieny offered an estimate today of global capacity to make a vaccine for the novel virus: somewhere between 1 billion and 2 billion doses in a year, based on an estimated seasonal vaccine capacity of about 900 million doses. Current world population is more than 6 billion. “It’s not at all that we’re hiding anything,” she said. “The reason nobody is answering this is that we don’t know.” For some vaccine makers, that would mean curtailing production of the seasonal flu vaccine for the northern hemisphere, since not all manufacturers have finished production. A WHO recommendation to do that could come in a few weeks, Kieny said. Kieny said “the vast majority” of manufacturers would need 5 to 6 months (from the identification of the virus) to begin producing a vaccine in quantity, but a few manufacturers might be able to start providing vaccine in as little as 4 months. “It will be a high-level meeting appealing for corporate responsibility and equitable access,” she said. In response to further questions, Kieny said she didn’t know “with any kind of precision” what fraction of potential pandemic vaccine production is already reserved. The experts will be asked if there’s enough evidence to warrant a WHO recommendation for manufacturers to start large-scale manufacturing of a vaccine for the new virus, said Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, director of the WHO’s Initiative for Vaccine Research, in a news teleconference in Geneva. She acknowledged that she previously mentioned an estimate of 700 million doses for seasonal vaccine production. She explained that the 900 million estimate is based on manufacturers’ figures and added that vaccine plants are under construction in several countries, increasing capacity month by month. It’s generally understood that with novel flu viruses, to which people have little or no immunity, two doses of vaccine may well be necessary. That’s true of H5N1 avian influenza vaccines, Kieny noted, but she said, “We hope that one dose will be sufficient [for the swine flu virus]. Before we know that, it’s very difficult to say how many doses will be available.” She added that most vaccine makers “still have some window of opportunity in their orders, and we want to make sure we don’t wait until that window is completely closed.” “What we’ve recommended for the timing at present was for all manufacturers to put everything in place to be able to start manufacturing vaccine,” she said. In response to questions today, she said some manufacturers might be able to make seasonal and swine flu vaccines at the same time, using different production facilities. “You can’t make two vaccines in the same plant at the same time,” but some companies have more than one facility, she commented.last_img read more

Increased number of airlines to Split and Brac

first_imgGreat announcements come to us from airports in Croatia, which this year never have more scheduled flights.In 2018, between March 25 and October 27, it was introduced more than 70 new regular lines, while the growth of the total number of rotations is 15% compared to 2017. This growth represents an increase in the number of rotations from 29.843 rotations in 2017 to more than 34.400 rotations in 2018. And that this season will be a record again, or at least on the right track, is shown by the data as they are in February 2018 Croatian airports recorded 229 thousand passengers or 13,9% more than in the same month last year, according to data from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS).Analyzing the summer flight schedule by destination, according to the absolute number of announced new rotations, Split leads with an increase of 27,7%, in second place is Dubrovnik with an increase of 19,6%, while in third place is Zagreb with a growth of 6%. This year, in addition to numerous multi-year flights from European cities, Split Airport will be connected by new Volote flights with Nice, Palermo and Bergamo, while Thomas Cook flights will connect it with London, Bristol and Glasgow, Dausseldorf and Hanover. , so this year Split will have almost 90 direct lines with Europe.A year after the new extended runway of Brac Airport was put into operation, this year it is planned that twice as many passengers will land on it as last year. Thus, with 47 airline guests as expected on the basis of already signed contracts and flight announcements, Brac would have the best year in the history of the airport. “86-seater Dash planes will fly from Zagreb, and the Adria Airways route from Ljubljana to Brač will be introduced for the first time in May. flights via Ljubljana to Brac directly from Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam ” said is Tonči Peović, director of Brač Airport.From this summer, it will be possible to fly to Brac for the first time from Bern, Switzerland, by Skyworks, which will fly a 60-seat plane on Saturdays from June, just as Luxembourg will be connected to Brac every week. TUI is strengthening all its lines to Brač, so it flies from Brussels, Rotterdam and Deauville, and in the peak season, two-week lines to Brač from Italy are expected.Related news:MORE THAN 70 NEW REGULAR AIRLINES INTRODUCED FROM MARCH TO END OF OCTOBERPASSENGER GROWTH IN AIRPORTS OF 14% ACHIEVED IN FEBRUARYIS THE RIJEKA-KÖLN AIRLINE THREATENED THROUGH POOR FULLNESS?</p>
<p><a href=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/BurstingPipe/adServer.bs?cn=brd&FlightID=24629406&Page=&PluID=0&Pos=904387822″ target=”_blank”><img src=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/BurstingPipe/adServer.bs?cn=bsr&FlightID=24629406&Page=&PluID=0&Pos=904387822″ border=0 width=1280 height=500></a></p>
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U.S. must lead fight against killer pollution

first_imgHarmful particulates, toxic chemicals and smog-forming gases result from fuel burning, from primitive dung-fired cooking stoves to massive coal-burning power plants.These and other forms of pollution promote asthma, heart disease, stroke, lung cancer and other maladies.Premature death is only one problem.Long-term impairment before death also results in human misery and material impoverishment. Developing nations, many of which lack strong environmental enforcement, are much worse off than developed countries, the study found.Poor and middle-income nations account for 92 percent of the premature deaths globally.Pollution drives a full quarter of deaths in some lower-income countries. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post. A major study published last month in the Lancet, a British medical journal, found that there is a global killer responsible for more yearly deaths than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined.Pollution.The problem is pervasive, affecting every country on the planet.It is expensive, costing the globe a whopping $4.6 trillion a year — about 6 percent of global gross domestic product — in hours not worked, premature deaths, health spending and eroded quality of life.The study associated pollution with 1 in 6 premature deaths, 9 million people in 2015.Even if the numbers are off a bit, the magnitude is striking.Air pollution is the leading culprit, linked to 6.5 million deaths, followed by water pollution, with 1.8 million. The study’s authors argue that this human toll is not the inevitable price of development, nor a problem that will simply disappear with growth; countries should not “wait for an economy to reach a magical tipping point that will solve the problems of environmental degradation and pollution-related disease,” they write. Instead, the authors insist, developing nations should look to the United States.The creation of the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970 and the enforcement of the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act, each passed in the early 1970s and updated since, resulted in dramatic reductions in harmful pollution, over a period of time in which the economy more than doubled in size.Not every pollution restriction that environmentalists dream up makes sense.But mandating relatively cheap pollution controls or, when possible, simply taxing polluters for the damage they do can result in a good value proposition for developing and developed nations alike. Poor countries struggling to pull their citizens out of abject poverty may yet find it tough to take the long view.Many Americans, including those in the Trump administration, still fail to do so. Conservative critics of environmental rules often overstate the potential costs of pollution controls and discount the benefits.The Trump administration is on this basis weakening pollution rules across the board, sending an early signal about its approach by tapping Scott Pruitt, a climate-change denier, to lead the EPA.Yet the United States has hardly finished the job; the nation still sees tons of pollution pumped into the air, directly harming people and contributing to global warming.Meanwhile, the federal government has not yet addressed other forms of pollution, such as toxic chemical exposure, with needed rigor, and the Trump administration has sent negative signals about its intentions to do so. The Lancet study should remind leaders in the United States and elsewhere that, though there are costs associated with restricting pollution, countries also incur costs by failing to do so.Finding the right balance requires acknowledging both sides and weighing them carefully.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Saturday, Dec. 28

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionOppose new toll/tax on upstate driversHere we go again. New York just keeps finding new reasons to take more of our hard-earned money.We’ve seen proposals for toll hikes to pay for the Tappan Zee Bridge, then for license plate replacement fees, and this time targeting drivers without E-ZPass. A new proposal from the Thruway Authority would increase tolls for drivers who pay cash, 30% more to be exact, and another $2 for each billing statement.It’s completely unfair to force drivers to have E-ZPass or pay more. This amounts to nothing more than another tax. I’m ready to fight tooth and nail against any toll hikes on upstate drivers.We pay more than enough already, but it seems like the state will never stop trying to take more.Angelo SantabarbaraSchenectadyThe writer represents the 111th Assembly District in the state Legislature.Focus on positives to boost your spiritsI have been trying to figure out why I am having difficulty getting into the Christmas spirit this year.In the past, I related it to my career, which I retired from three years ago, of a public safety dispatcher.The constant barrage of complaints, the domestic calls, serious accidents and life-threatening medical calls always made it very difficult. So why this year?Since I retired, it was easy to get in the spirit. But I finally have figured it out. It is due to the constant barrage of negative news, complaining and griping, on the television and at social locations, such as my gym and other locations. All you hear is the negative.Politics, starting at the top, both local and national, and encompassing all parties and levels, has caused a caustic, negative and damaging effect to all levels of the social economic system. The few positives that come out are very soundly trounced by the negative.I was taught, by a very good manager at one of my previous employments, that negativity is like a cancer: Once it starts, it takes over. Positive thoughts and actions have a very difficult time conquering the negative, but when it does, everyone feels better.I, for one, choose to look at the positive and push the positive. I challenge the aforementioned, and everyone else, to do the same and see what a difference each of us can make.That will give us the Christmas and giving spirit all year long.David W. GallupScotia‘Trump Impeached’ photo showed biasA number of readers of The Daily Gazette have written letters to the editor decrying the newspaper’s “left leanings” or “liberal bent.”I personally do not recall any letters alleging the opposite.In fact, I have always considered The Gazette to be a fairly unbiased and impartial publication.Until, that is, I saw the front page of the Dec. 19 edition.Under the larger-than-normal, bold-faced headline, “Trump Impeached” was a huge photograph of Donald Trump with his arms outstretched at his sides, his eyes half-closed, and a somber, somewhat somnolescent expression on his face.Of all the many photos of this man that were available, The Gazette chose to print one that clearly portrays him as a persecuted victim of crucifixion, unmistakably evoking images of another historical figure who claimed to be leading his followers to their salvation. Seriously?Paul DeierleinSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Studying the form

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Industry rounds on planning reforms

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img