Absorbing Rohingya refugees difficult for Bangladesh US

first_imgUS State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert The United States has acknowledged that thousands of Rohingya refugees created a “difficult situation” for Bangladesh.“I know it is a difficult situation for Bangladesh, as it is for any country, to absorb refugees,” US State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said at a regular press briefing in Washington on Thursday.The US State Department published the entire proceedings of the press briefing of its spokesperson on its website.“What we’ve seen there has been very concerning to the US government as we care about what is happening to the population there. We care about what is happening to the population there [in Rakhine],” said Nauert.Asked if the US might slap a sanction on Myanmar for human rights violations, Nauert declined to comment saying the US was currently having “diplomatic conversations at this point”.“Any potential sanctions are just not something that I could comment on this time. Either – assuming that they might happen, or might not happen,” she said.“We are deeply concerned by the troubling situation in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state,” she said, adding there has been a significant displacement of local populations, following serious allegations of human rights abuses, including mass burnings of Rohingya villages and violence conducted by security forces and also armed civilians.“We, again, condemn deadly attacks on Myanmarese security forces, but join the international community in calling on those forces to prevent further violence and protect local populations in ways that are consistent with the rule of law and with full respect for human rights,” she said at the briefing.She said the United States is working through the United Nations and other international organisations to assist tens of thousands of civilians who have fled to southeastern Bangladesh since 25 August.“We call on the authorities to facilitate immediate access to affected communities that are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance,” the spokesperson said.“We are also communicating with Myanmar’s neighbours and other concerned international partners on efforts to end the violence and assist affected communities there,” she added.About access of aid workers and journalists to the Rakhaine state, the spokesperson said, “We’d like to certainly call on the government of Myanmar to allow better, greater access for reporters and journalists to be able to enter that country and be able to provide accurate information about what’s going on the ground.”“There also remains a humanitarian situation, where it is very difficult for humanitarian aid groups to be able to get in and provide the supplies and the support that is necessary. We are continuing to have conversations with the government, not only about the violence there, but also about those issues of journalists and also, perhaps more importantly, the humanitarian aid situation,” she added.last_img read more

The First Website Turns 25 How the Web Surprised Charmed and Changed

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Register Now » August 23, 2016center_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. This month, the first website turned 25. Of course, the internet has its share of milestones. Some trace its birthday to the first message sent from one computer to another in 1969 as researchers developed ARPANET, what would become the Internet. Some call that the web’s “first breath.”And we can hardly ignore March 12, 1989, when an information management system was first proposed to help drive the web’s structure and architecture.But the lives of everyday people — and entrepreneurs — weren’t yet transformed. Those shifts became more possible later in 1991.  On Aug. 6 of that year, the first website went live and was publicly available. On this day, like so many big days, there was no ticker tape. There were no formal announcements. Most people didn’t even have computers at home. But by 2000, more than two in five households would have Internet access. This access would revolutionize how we work, play, learn, connect and build our lives.Today, Internaut Day, celebrates the Internet and how far it has come. To mark this great date, we’ve pulled together a special collection of stories. In them, we share screenshots of early homepages that might shock and surprise you. We connect with early online pioneers to find out what they’ve learned — and what they regret. And we round up the moments that helped shape the world in which we currently live.Take a look and enjoy a trip down memory lane — or what we once called the Information Superhighway.Related: The Public World Wide Web Turns 25Founders of AOL, Twitter and More Share the Best and Worst Moments in Internet History13 Pivotal Internet Moments That Forever Changed How We Live, Work and Play15 Throwback Web Pages That Show Us How the Internet Has ChangedWhy the Internet Needs the WayBack Machine, the Site That Archives the Web15 Internet Relics We Miss (and Some We Don’t)  last_img read more