ExWolverine Updates Decommits Summer 2019

first_imgA.J. Dillon (image via ACC Sports) Antwaine Richardson, S (Maryland): Richardson will likely be the starter at strong safety for the Terps. Amauri Pesek-Hickson, LB (Kansas): Pesek-Hickson is just starting his career at Kansas. Tyrece Woods, DE (Buffalo): Woods is just starting his career at Buffalo. 1 0You need to login in order to vote George Campbell, WR (West Virginia): Campbell announced that he was transferring out of Florida State, and the rumor was that he was headed to Penn State. However, he is now on WVU’s roster and listed as a 6’4″, 184 lb. redshirt senior. Kevin Doyle, QB (Arizona): Doyle, a redshirt freshman now, is not in the top three at his position for the Wildcats. Otis Reese, S (Georgia): Reese is listed #2 on the depth chart at safety for the Bulldogs as a sophomore. Messiah DeWeaver, QB (Old Dominion): DeWeaver is #2 on the depth chart going into his first season with the Monarchs. Erik Swenson, OT (Oklahoma): Swenson is penciled in as the starter at left tackle for the Sooners in 2019. DECOMMITS Emil Ekiyor, OG (Alabama): Ekiyor will likely be the starter at left guard this season as a redshirt freshman. Jordan Elliott, DT (Missouri): Elliott is expected to start at 3-tech for the Tigers this fall. Antwuan Johnson, LB (transfer portal): Johnson is in the process of transferring out of Bowling Green State University, although his destination is unknown at this point. Kalil Branham, WR (Kentucky): Columbus (OH) Northland wideout Branham is headed to Kentucky. Jalil Irvin, OG (Auburn): Irvin played in one game as a true freshman in 2018, but he’s not in the two-deep heading into 2019. Tim Baldwin, RB (undecided): Ashburn (VA) Broad Run’s Tim Baldwin is still undecided on where he will play college football, and he has no 247 Sports crystal ball picks in, either. Chase Lasater, LB (Florida Atlantic): Lasater is #2 on the depth chart at inside linebacker for the Owls. Jeremiah “J.J.” Holloman, WR (Georgia): Holloman was the leading returning receiver for the Bulldogs, but with a ton of talent entering, he may not have ended up being the #1 receiver during the year. Alas, he was dismissed from the team for allegedly assaulting a female in April of 2018 (LINK).center_img Eric Gray, RB (Tennessee): Gray is just starting his career at Tennessee. Darrin Kirkland, LB (Tennessee): Although he’s a fifth year senior with starting experience, Kirkland is expected to be a backup middle linebacker for the Vols. Shaun Crawford, CB (Notre Dame): Crawford, who suffered another torn ACL that ruined his 2018, is returning to Notre Dame for his final season of eligibility – although he might be able to get a sixth year if he applies for one in 2020. He is expected to be a nickel corner. Tags: A.J. Dillon, Amauri Pesek-Hickson, Antwaine Richardson, Antwuan Johnson, Chase Lasater, Darrin Kirkland Jr., David Reese II, Dele’ Harding, Denver Warren, Devery Hamilton, Emil Ekiyor, Eric Gray, Erik Swenson, Ex-Wolverines, Garrett Taylor, George Campbell Jr., Jalil Irvin, Jeremiah Holloman, Jordan Elliott, Kai-Leon Herbert, Kalil Branham, Kevin Doyle, Kurt Taylor, Leonard Taylor, Messiah DeWeaver, Otis Reese, Shaun Crawford, Stephen Herron Jr., Tim Baldwin, Victor Viramontes Stephen Herron, Jr., DE (Stanford): Herron is just starting his career at Stanford. Leonard Taylor, TE (Cincinnati): Taylor is not in the two-deep at Cincinnati going into 2019. Victor Viramontes, LB (UNLV): Viramontes, who was the starting quarterback at Riverside City College two seasons ago, is now likely to be the starting middle linebacker for the Runnin’ Rebels in 2019. Devery Hamilton, OT (Stanford): Hamilton is slated to start at left guard for Stanford in the fall. Hit the jump for more. Garrett Taylor, S (Penn State): Taylor will likely start at strong safety in 2019 as a fifth year senior. Kai-Leon Herbert, OG (Miami): Herbert is listed at #2 on the depth chart for the Hurricanes at offensive guard. Dele’ Harding, LB (Illinois): Harding is expected to be the Illini’s starting middle linebacker in 2019. Denver Warren, DT (undecided): Warren, from Aurora (IL) West before transferring to Oak Lawn (IL) Brother Rice, is also still undecided and has not taken any official visits yet. David Reese II, LB (Florida): Reese will be the starting middle linebacker once again for the Gators. Kurt Taylor, RB (Iowa Central Community College): Taylor is transferring to ICCC for his junior year of college. A.J. Dillon, RB (Boston College): Dillon is the starter at Boston College going into his junior year. This will likely be his final year of college football as he looks to move on to the NFL.last_img read more

Abnormal sleep duration linked to metabolic syndrome in new study

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJun 14 2018Sleeping too little or even too much has been associated with several disease conditions including metabolic syndrome that predisposes a person to develop diabetes, stroke and heart disease. The findings of the study titled, “Association between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study,” was published in the latest issue of the journal BMC Public Health.For their study, a team of researchers from South Korea at the Seoul National University College of Medicine looked at the association between duration of sleep and metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is typically a combination of several conditions such as excessive fat around the waist, raised blood sugar, raised blood pressure and raised levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. The team of researchers obtained sleep as well as health parameters data from a large population of men and women from the Health Examinees (HEXA) study.The study was conducted between 2004 and 2013 and looked into detailed medical histories, prescription medication use, exercise and diet levels and sleep durations of 133,608 Korean participants (44,930 men, 88,678 women) aged between 40 and 69 years. Blood and urine samples were collected from them for testing the biochemical parameters. Each of the participants were asked to detail the total number of hours they spent sleeping per day. This included night time sleep as well as day time naps.They found that 29 and 24 percent of men and women respectively had metabolic syndrome. Additionally they saw that on an average, people who slept for less than six hours a day or more than ten hours a day were at a greater risk of metabolic syndrome than those who slept an average of six to seven hours a day. The researchers noted 11 percent of the sample of men slept for less than six hours and they were more likely to have a larger waist and metabolic syndrome. They noted that 13 percent of the women participants slept for less than six hours per day on an average and they were more likely to have a greater waist measurement. On the other hand 1.5 percent of the men slept for over ten hours per day and were at a greater risk of metabolic syndrome and higher triglycerides in their blood. Of the participants 1.7 percent women slept for more than ten hours per day and these women were at a greater risk of metabolic syndrome, larger waist circumference, raised blood sugar and triglycerides and lower levels of good cholesterol (HDL-C).Lead author of the study Claire E. Kim from the Department of Preventive Medicine at Seoul National University College of Medicine, in her statement said, “We observed a potential gender difference between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome, with an association between metabolic syndrome and long sleep in women and metabolic syndrome and short sleep in men.” Kim said that this is the largest study that examines the “dose response” association between metabolic syndrome and sleep duration. She added that more research is necessary to find the exact reason how sleep is associated with metabolic syndrome. Researchers added that hormones could play a role in this association.Source: https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-018-5557-8last_img read more

New proposal aims to improve drug harm assessment process

first_img Source:https://news.ncsu.edu/2018/08/improving-assessment-drug-risks/ Aug 20 2018A drug policy researcher is proposing a suite of changes to overhaul the Multi-Criteria Drug Harm Scale (MCDHS), which informs drug policies across Europe. The changes focus on addressing use and abuse separately, collecting input from a broader range of stakeholders, and targeting substance-specific experts for drug review panels.”The MCDHS, also known as the Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis of Drug Harms, is a valuable tool that allows for informed decision making about substances that can have serious consequences for health and well-being on a national scale,” says Veljko Dubljevic, author of a paper describing the proposals. “But there is significant room for improvement.” Dubljevic is an assistant professor of ethics at North Carolina State University and an affiliate of NC State’s Science, Technology & Society program”My proposals would allow for a deeper assessment of the harms associated with substances such as opioids, cannabis, tobacco and stimulants,” Dubljevic says. “And this is an approach that I think the United States should adopt, rather than relying largely on industry-funded research.”The MCDHS has been around for about a decade, and draws on a panel of experts in psychiatry, pharmacology and addiction to rank a drug’s risk of causing harm in three areas: physical health effects, potential for dependence, and social harm. To date, the MCDHS has been used in the European Union, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Norway.The first of three changes Dubljevic is proposing to the MCDHS is to dissociate the harms of a drug’s use from the harms of its abuse.”The risks of drinking a glass of wine on the weekend are different from the risks associated with heavy drinking,” Dubljevic says. “The same is true for the proper use of a prescription drug versus chronic, off-label use. It’s important to assess the risks of drug use and drug abuse separately, and to give each drug two ratings: one for proper use and one for abuse.”Related StoriesDrugs designed with advanced computing technologies could help tackle hospital superbugsResearchers survey orthopedic providers to understand factors that drive opioid prescribing practicesBirth, child outcomes linked with maternal opioid use during pregnancyThe second proposal is to incorporate input from people on the front lines of drug use. Specifically, Dubljevic calls for panels to incorporate input from people who use drugs, pharmacists and general medical practitioners.”This local expertise can provide valuable perspectives that allow for a more robust understanding of a substance’s potential for addiction or social harms,” Dubljevic says.The third proposal is to eschew one-size-fits-all expert panels and instead form panels with substance-specific expertise.”For example, individuals with expertise in prescription opioids are likely not the same people with expertise in khat, a widely-used stimulant in eastern Africa and the Middle East,” Dubljevic says. It simply makes sense to convene different panels to ensure that the people with the relevant expertise are at the table.”The use of the MCDHS, regardless of whether my proposals are adopted, allows for more informed decision making by policymakers, with the potential for improving public health outcomes,” Dubljevic says. “That’s why I’d like to see the U.S. move toward incorporating the MCDHS into its drug evaluations.”For example, it’s probable that a more complete understanding of risks could boost efforts to develop ways of limiting a drug’s potential for abuse,” Dubljevic says. “One possibility, for instance, would be to encourage the development of more delayed-release pharmaceuticals, making it more difficult for the drugs to be used recreationally.”last_img read more

Public misconceptions around role of midwives trigger new awareness campaign

first_img Source:http://unisa.edu.au/Media-Centre/Releases/2018/Public-perception-of-midwives-role-in-maternity-care-sparks-public-awareness-campaign/ Aug 22 2018Research revealing public misconceptions around the role of midwives has triggered a public awareness campaign to help women make more informed choices around their healthcare options. A study from the Rosemary Bryant AO Research Center and School of Nursing and Midwifery of the University of South Australia found more than 50 per cent of respondents believed a woman needed to see a doctor during pregnancy and after the baby was born, yet less than a third believed it was necessary to see a doctor during labor and birth.Lead midwifery academic, Dr Lois McKellar says these survey results indicate the pubic associate midwives with birth, but do not understand the full suite of services and benefits they can provide during pregnancy and once a baby is born.“We want the public to better understand what midwives do, there is a public misconception that they are considered mostly as assistants during labor, rather than lead care providers before, during and after birth,” Dr McKellar says.“This lack of understanding impacts on women’s capacity to make an informed choice around their care options and may have hindered the uptake of midwifery-led models of care.”Midwifery-led care is a model where women receive care from a known midwife and Dr McKellar says multiple evidence-based national and international research studies have demonstrated the enormous benefits of this model, including less intervention, less premature births, increased satisfaction, as well as a decreased overall cost to health services.Related StoriesTackling high sugar content in baby foodResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairHow to get a cheaper prescription before leaving the doctor’s office“Nationwide, only 2.2 per cent of births occur through this model, despite numerous national and state service reviews recommending an increase in more woman-centred services,” Dr McKellar says.“South Australia has been a forerunner in the area, with about 6-7 per cent of women accessing care from a known midwife through midwifery group practice that is offered through the state’s major public hospitals.“One of the key advantages of this model, is that midwives get to know the woman prior to labor and they will understand her needs. For example, if the midwife understands the woman is prone to anxiety, they can provide suitable care when it’s required – whether that’s during the birth or as the new mum settles in at home with her new baby.”Dr McKellar says in the United Kingdom the NHS recently mandated that every woman has a known midwife and she believes emulating this model would have huge benefits here in Australia.The awareness campaign now underway in South Australia was developed by the Australian College of Midwives and funded by the SA Department of Premier and Cabinet.“As the public develop a better understanding on the benefits of care from a known midwife, it’s hoped that more women will openly seek midwifery-led care as a standard care option,” Dr McKellar says.last_img read more

New study shows how Ethiopia has managed to achieve extraordinary progress

first_img Source:https://www.berlin-institut.org/en/publications/studies-in-english/from-land-of-famine-to-land-of-hope Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 21 2018Ethiopia is one of the world’s least developed states. Yet for the past two decades the country has been making extraordinary progress. Targeted investment in health, education and employment has improved the standard of living and triggered a rapid decline in the fertility rate. If it succeeds in consolidating these achievements, Ethiopia could become one of the first sub-Saharan countries to benefit from the “demographic dividend” and demonstrate how development can work in Africa. A new study by the Berlin Institute shows how the country has already managed to come such a long way and which challenges remain to be overcome if it is to serve as a model country on the African continent. By African standards, Ethiopia is already doing well. With the second-largest population in Africa, it is one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. Together with assistance from abroad, the government’s long-term development plans have already improved the lives of many people and more than halved the share of the population living in poverty. Through the expansion of the health system, child mortality has decreased. The rate of school enrolment has more than doubled thanks to increased investment in education of up to 30 percent of national budget expenditure. In less than 20 years, the number of schools has risen by a factor of 25. Grain yields have more than doubled since 1990. At the same time, Ethiopia is increasingly becoming a target country for foreign investors, whose financial commitment should help to create jobs for the growing population.Development progress to date has also ushered in another positive trend. The fertility rate is falling rapidly, putting a brake on population growth and changing the country’s age structure. Because women are having fewer children, the population of working age has been growing faster than the population as a whole since the early 2000s. Ethiopia is thus heading for a “demographic bonus”, which in many other countries worldwide has paved the way to more growth and prosperity. Given the right framework conditions, this bonus could be transformed into a demographically determined spur to development. Like the Asian tiger states before it, Ethiopia could benefit from its demographic dividend provided it manages to consolidate its progress to date.Related StoriesResearchers evaluate usefulness of fertility appsStress during early pregnancy may reduce future fertility of offspringAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaDespite all its achievements, the country still faces enormous challenges. The development process has been marked by ethnic tensions and ruthlessly driven forward, often with little regard for human rights. The expansion of basic infrastructure has barely been able to keep up with population growth, and the number of people of working age is still growing faster than the number of jobs. Hopes are now pinned on the young prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, to introduce the necessary reforms and measures with which to overcome these challenges.The hoped-for further progress is unlikely to happen without international assistance. Ethiopia is depending on foreign help to achieve its goals. Were the engine of development to stall, there would be far-reaching consequences. “If Ethiopia fails, the stability of the entire region in the Horn of Africa will be endangered,” says Reiner Klingholz, director of the Berlin Institute for Population and Development. Flight and explusions would be inevitable. The European Union should therefore give Ethiopia as much financial support and advice as possible so that the country can break out of the vicious circle of poverty and rapid population growth, the study concludes.The study was financed by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) with funds from the Austrian Development Cooperation as well as by the DEG (Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft) and the GfK Verein. You can download the study free of charge as a PDF under:last_img read more

Australian university pulls plug on climate skeptics center

first_imgSYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—The Australian government’s controversial move to host a think tank headed by noted global warming skeptic Bjørn Lomborg has unraveled—for now. But Australia’s education minister has vowed to find a new home for the center at a willing institution.Last month, the University of Western Australia (UWA) in Perth announced plans to set up an Australian Consensus Centre (ACC), chaired by Lomborg, that would conduct policy research on overseas aid, Australian prosperity, agriculture, and regional issues. UWA announced that the federal government would contribute roughly one-third of ACC’s operating costs. The rest of the budget would come from corporate sponsors and government grants.  Scientists were outraged, especially when UWA revealed on 20 April that the government had already contributed AU$4 million to launch the think tank. That’s a hefty sum to a scientific community that has had to tighten its belt in recent months. The 2014 budgets for five major R&D agencies endured a combined cut of more than AU$420 million; the lead R&D agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, has had to close labs and facilities and is slated to have eliminated almost 1300 jobs by the end of next month, representing a 20% cut to its workforce. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Given such shaky support for science, ACC’s establishment “is an insult to Australia’s scientific community,” says mammalogist Tim Flannery, a founder of the nonprofit Climate Council. He and others contend ACC is politically motivated: Since coming into power in September 2013, the conservative government has scrapped Australia’s Clean Energy Act and the government’s Climate Change Authority and shuttered the independent Climate Change Commission, claiming its AU$1.5 million annual operating costs were too expensive.Outrage grew after Fairfax Media newspapers revealed on 23 April that the push for ACC came from Prime Minister Tony Abbott, a Lomborg admirer who quoted the Danish researcher favorably in his 2009 book Battlelines. Although Lomborg has said he accepts that the climate is changing, he has downplayed global warming’s contribution in two popular books, The Skeptical Environmentalist and Cool It, and in reports from his Copenhagen Consensus Centre, a network registered as a U.S. nonprofit. Lomborg argues that money spent cutting greenhouse gas emissions would be better spent on climate change adaptation or tackling poverty. In March, Abbott invited Lomborg to launch the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Innovation Hub and Lomborg now sits on a government-appointed panel advising Australia’s foreign aid programs.Lomborg’s influence in Australia irks researchers like Matt England, a climate scientist at University of New South Wales. “Lomborg has been discredited over the years with some bizarre statements about climate physics,” England asserts. “He just doesn’t get it.”In a letter to UWA’s head of corporate and governance affairs, obtained by Fairfax Media, neuroscientist Sarah Dunlop, head of the university’s School of Animal Biology, claimed that Lomborg lacks the academic track record to justify his appointment as an adjunct professor. At a packed meeting of the university academic council on 24 April, she called on UWA to cut its relationship with Lomborg.With “great regret and disappointment,” UWA Vice-Chancellor Paul Johnson announced on 8 May that he had advised the federal government that the university would cancel the contract to set up ACC and return the money. But the saga is not over, Minister for Education and Training Christopher Pyne assured supporters via Twitter the next day. “Don’t worry, I’m certain we’ll find a new home for the Australian Consensus Centre,” he tweeted. Lomborg told The Guardian on 8 May that he is committed to ACC because his research  is “far too important to let fall victim to toxic politics” and “grossly misinformed attacks.”last_img read more

Climate cycles didnt shape oceans abyssal hills

first_img Email Earlier this year, two papers—one published in Science and the other in Geophysical Review Letters—added a new wrinkle to the debate. They suggested that long-term climate cycles could be modulating the amount of magma erupting on the sea floor. As glaciers grew and retreated, sea levels rose and fell. Those massive fluctuations in pressure would drive periodic pulses of magma to erupt. The Science paper further suggested the distribution of hills at one mid-ocean ridge could be matched with three well-known climate cycles—the Milankovitch cycles—that take place every 23,000, 41,000, and 100,000 years. These Milankovitch cycles are tied to Earth’s wobbly orbital axis, its oscillating axial tilt, and its orbital eccentricity. Jean-Arthur Olive Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Can Earth’s ice ages be seen in the undulating fabric of the sea floor? Earlier this year, a pair of papers suggested that long-term cycles of glaciation and melting trigger pulses of lava that harden into sea floor hills. But now, a new study throws cold water on that hypothesis, finding that these climate-driven pulses did not significantly shape the sea floor. Instead, they say, the underwater hills likely come from faulting action and steady—rather than climate-driven—magma eruptions.“The main point is that the crustal bathymetry is complex,” says David Lund, a paleoceanographer at the University of Connecticut, Avery Point, who was not involved with the study. With so many processes shaping the sea floor, he says, climate-related signals are extremely difficult to detect.A map of Earth’s ocean floor reveals a jagged landscape of tall mid-ocean ridges flanked by a rippling series of smaller hills and grooves. These so-called abyssal hills, some a few hundred meters high, are the most abundant topographic feature on Earth, covering about a third of the ocean floor. Given their ubiquity, geologists have long tried to understand their origin. They have, of course, long known that mid-ocean ridges are the birthplace of new sea floor. As two tectonic plates pull apart, magma wells into the gap, cooling into new rock that is then dragged away from the ridge. Then, as the crust stretches and cools, it cracks, forming faults that allow up-and-down movement. Some scientists have argued that this process alone is sufficient to produce the rugged terrain at most ridges. But others say that periodic fluctuations in magma volume can also help make the abyssal hills. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe But Jean-Arthur Olive, a geodynamicist at Columbia University and lead author of the new paper, doubted that seafloor topography would be sensitive enough to record such relatively rapid changes in magma supply. Even long-term climate cycles are short relative to geologic time, where “we’re talking about hundreds of thousands to millions of years for plate tectonics,” Olive says.To find out whether the climate-driven hypothesis was possible, Olive and his colleagues modeled three different ways in which such rapid pulses of magma might change the face of the sea floor. First, they examined the strength of the tectonic plate itself. The bulk of the plate is made of oceanic crust, a relatively light layer of rock that floats on the denser mantle like a boat floating on water. Newly formed sea floor becomes part of that crust.But most new crust is not erupted and added to the sea floor, but is but is tacked on to the base of the crust. So the researchers wanted to determine whether pulses of magma would produce a crust thick and heavy enough to warp its surface. The models suggested it wouldn’t: The magma inputs didn’t significantly alter the surface of the sea floor. “The plates at the ridge axis simply have too much strength to deform enough to create topography that way,” Olive says.  A second test looked at how much sea floor a mass of magma could make. The team found that magma pulses that accumulated over 100,000 years—the longest of the three Milankovitch cycles—could produce tens of meters of crust. But the abyssal hills at some ridges can reach 200 meters high, so high that a few extra tens of meters wouldn’t make much of a difference.Finally, Olive and his team looked at how climate-driven magma pulses might interact with active faults to shape the sea floor. Different mid-ocean ridges spread at different rates; if magma pulses helped shape the abyssal hills on the ridges’ flanks, then the fastest-spreading ridges would have hills spaced farther apart, while slower-spreading ridges would have hills clustered closer together. But the reverse has long been known to be true.  So Olive and his team devised a new explanation: At fast-spreading ridges with abundant magma eruptions, the cooling, stretching crust forms new faults in rapid succession as it continues to spread. Under normal conditions, “You end up with a lot of closely spaced faults, and [few hills],” says Olive.Richard Katz, a geodynamicist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom who was an author on the previous Science paper, says he welcomes the new ideas. “The paper we published—we always knew it would be controversial.” But Katz contends the new study’s models are too simplistic. “Those models weren’t developed to consider processes at shorter times and spatial scales. While I think it’s reasonable to do what they’ve done, it’s also reasonable to say that these models aren’t detailed enough to capture these observations,” Katz says. The best way to resolve this, he says, is to gather and analyze more data from additional ridges.Gathering data from additional ridges is one strategy, Lund agrees. Another, he says, is to find a different proxy for climate-driven pulses of magma altogether—one that is independent of tectonics. To that end, he says, he and others have been examining hydrothermal vents at a mid-ocean ridge known as the East Pacific Rise. Such vents can serve as records of heat activity—which may include pulses of magma—at the ridge through time. Olive acknowledges that they’ve used a simplified model, but he doesn’t think a more detailed one will produce different results.  Rather than focusing on the surface expression of the abyssal hills, he and his colleagues suggest that researchers hunting for signals from climate cycles use seismic imaging at the base of the oceanic crust, where much of the new sea floor accretes and rapid pulses of magma might be more observable. “We’re not contradicting the idea that the modulations exist,” he emphasizes. “We’re contradicting the idea that it leads to the sea floor landscapes.”last_img read more

Ground hunting led to spider explosion

first_imgWhen arachnologists set out to better understand how the world’s spiders were all related, they weren’t quite prepared for what they found. Many researchers had thought that orb weaving—which yields those beautiful circular webs that hang between tree branches—was the pinnacle of spider evolution, making possible the rise of many of the tens of thousands of spiders that exist today. But a new family tree suggests it was hunting on the ground that led to a spider explosion, and that that orb weaving played only a minor role. A large team looked at 3400 genes from 70 species, using a relatively new technique for pulling out all the active genes from a genome to analyze. The new family tree shows that terrestrial spiders were the ones that really expanded in number about 100 million years ago, the researchers report online today in PeerJ. Most of these species, which include fishing, jumping, flower, and wolf spiders (above), derive from a single branch where males all have a tiny hook on each of the short front legs used in mating. The invention of feathers in birds, and the invention of flowers in plants made possible the rapid evolution of lots of new species. But it’s not the mating hooks that make the difference for spiders, the researchers say. Instead, they think that the spiders stem from a single ancestor that gave up orb weaving in favor of ground hunting, where insect prey were more plentiful than in the air. Although there are 45,000 known species of spiders, the 70 represent a good cross-section, solidifying the spider family tree.last_img read more

These bats use stealth sonar likely to evade rivals

first_img By Roni DenglerMay. 1, 2018 , 7:01 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Newscom Email 00:0000:0000:00 00:0000:0000:00 Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Hoary bats are habitual squawkers. Sporting frosted brown fur á la Guy Fieri, the water balloon–size bats bark high-pitched yips to navigate the dark night sky by echolocation. But a new study reveals that as they fly, those cries often drop to a whisper, or even silence, suggesting the bats may steer themselves through the darkness with some of the quietest sonar on record.To find out how hoary bats navigate, researchers used infrared cameras and ultrasonic microphones to record scores of them flying through a riverside corridor in California on five autumn nights. In about half of the nearly 80 flights, scientists captured a novel type of call. Shorter, faster, and quieter than their usual calls, the new “micro” calls use three orders of magnitude less sound energy than other bats’ yaps did, the researchers report today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. As bats approached objects, they would often quickly increase the volume of their calls. But in close to half the flights, researchers did not pick up any calls at all. So why risk starvation and fatal crashes? Making normal-intensity calls might attract unwanted aggression from potential rivals, say the researchers, who conducted their study during the bats’ mating season. Microcalls are much more discreet, slashing the distance that other bats can “eavesdrop” from about 92 meters to 12. So the stealth sonar might simply be part of a larger tactic to keep rival males out of earshot. This stealth flying mode may explain one sad fact of hoary bat life: They suffer more fatal run-ins with wind turbines than other bat species in North America. The microcalls are so quiet that they reduce the distance over which bats can detect large and small objects by more than three times. That also cuts bats’ reaction time by two-thirds, making them too slow to catch their insect prey. Listen to a regular hoary bat call here. These bats use stealth sonar, likely to evade rivals Listen to a microcall here. last_img read more

Trump administration restricts fetal tissue research

first_imgFetal brain tissue is used for federally funded studies of Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases and conditions. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Meredith WadmanJun. 5, 2019 , 2:26 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The administration is also killing a roughly $2 million annual contract between NIH and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), which for years has used fetal tissue to create mice with humanlike immune systems for HIV drug testing. In its statement announcing the action, HHS declared, “Promoting the dignity of human life from conception to natural death is one of the very top priorities of President Trump’s administration.” A statement from UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood, however, called the move “politically motivated, short-sighted and not based on sound science.”Groups that oppose fetal tissue research and had encouraged the Trump administration to undertake the review are applauding the moves. “This is a major pro-life victory and we thank President Trump for taking decisive action. It is outrageous and disgusting that we have been complicit, through our taxpayer dollars, in the experimentation using baby body parts,” said Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, a Washington, D.C., lobbying group that opposes abortion.David Prentice, vice president and research director of the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Arlington, Virginia, the research arm of the Susan B. Anthony list, added: “Our government will now invest in effective research methods that do not rely on the destruction of human life.”Opponents of restrictions on fetal tissue research, which they say plays an important role in understanding diseases and developing treatments, were disappointed. The HHS announcement “is a clear indication that this administration values symbolic statements over research aimed at saving lives,” says Alta Charo, a lawyer and bioethicist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. “It is yet another example of this administration’s determination to ignore evidence when setting policy.”“I think it’s a terrible policy ultimately. If you think about it, fetal tissue will be incinerated instead of using it for valuable research. What’s the sense in that?” says Lawrence Goldstein, a neuroscientist at UC San Diego, who uses human fetal tissue for his work studying Alzheimer’s disease.Under the new policy, extramural researchers who submit applications that pass scientific review and score high enough to be funded will now encounter a new and time-consuming layer of review. Under a procedure described in a 2006 law that governs NIH policy, HHS will need to announce in the Federal Register that it plans to assemble an ethics advisory board to review each proposed grant and invite public nominations for that board. The board would be made up of 14 to 20 people from various backgrounds, including at least one theologian, one ethicist, one physician, and one attorney. No more than half of the panel members can be scientists. The HHS secretary must wait at least 30 days after the publication to appoint the board. The board will then have up to 150 days to recommend to the secretary whether the proposed research should be funded.Even then, the Secretary can overrule the committee if he finds its recommendation “arbitrary and capricious.” “The whole point here is to so wrap the research in red tape that it’s impossible or at least unlikely to be feasible for many researchers to embark on this,” Charo contends.The now-canceled UCSF contract, the latest in a series, has been in place since 2013. It was normally renewed each December; since December 2018 it has been granted two 90-day extensions. The second expires today. As recently as April, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases had indicated it was preparing to grant another 90-day extension.According to HHS, the new ban on fetal tissue research by NIH scientists will end three active projects. Each project will be permitted to use up its current store of fetal tissue before shutting down. One of the projects, at NIH’s Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, was beginning to progress after it was stalled when the Trump administration review was first announced in September 2018. The study, which used fetal tissue to create mice with humanlike immune systems, was examining whether an antibody might prevent HIV from establishing reservoirs in the human body.*Correction, 6 June, 11 a.m.: The amounts of NIH intramural and extramural spending in 2018 on projects involving fetal tissue have been corrected. (The total NIH spending of $115 million in 2018 remains the same.)center_img Email Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source After a 9-month review, President Donald Trump’s administration is moving to eliminate some federally funded research that relies on fetal tissue from elective abortions and to more tightly regulate the rest.The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced today that it will no longer allow government scientists working for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct studies that use fetal tissue. Such intramural studies received about $31 million last year.HHS also said university scientists who want NIH funding for such studies must now have each proposal examined by an ethics advisory board. The new policy will not affect currently funded extramural projects; there are about 200 such studies, which received about $84 million in 2018. But the new policy will apply to researchers who apply for a renewal of a current grant or for new grants. Trump administration restricts fetal tissue researchlast_img read more

NASA rover catches big whiff of methane on Mars—but where did it

first_img By Paul VoosenJun. 24, 2019 , 12:35 PM NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS NASA rover catches big whiff of methane on Mars—but where did it come from?center_img Last week, NASA’s Curiosity rover caught its strongest whiff yet of martian methane. While exploring a clay-rich region of the Red Planet, the rover detected the highest levels of the gas it has ever observed, some 21 parts per billion. That’s three times the level it sniffed out for several months in 2013.The finding, if it holds up, will only deepen the mystery of methane on Mars. Methane can be a byproduct of microbial life, but it can also be produced through geological reactions or created in the atmosphere from carbon in solar system dust. Until now, the large spike seen by Curiosity in 2013 has never been repeated; instead, the rover has documented minute levels of methane that shifted with the seasons. Adding to that mystery, last year the European Space Agency’s Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), which started scanning Mars’s atmosphere for methane in 2016, did not detect any of the gas, despite carrying instruments far more sensitive than Curiosity’s.Curiosity’s scientists say it might be possible for thousands of small seeps in Mars’s surface—none of which would be detectable from orbit—to release the gas. Follow up work with the TGO and Mars Express, another orbiter, will reveal whether their instruments picked up this latest martian burp. If they did, they might give scientists some sense of the plume’s origin and how long methane lasts in the planet’s atmosphere.last_img read more

Neighbor Kills HBCU Grad Who Was Seeking Protection

first_img 22 Times Racists Got Dealt With On Video For Being Racist Tyrique Hudson was recently killed by his white neighbor after asking the court for a protective order against the guy. The judge denied the protective order because it wasn’t enough evidence. Tyrique was killed last week on his way to work by this same neighbor. He was only 22 pic.twitter.com/rPTZSZMQPb— lebronsbae (@Baiellieo) April 24, 2019 Hudson, a 22-year-old graduate of North Carolina A&T University, was killed in the stairwell of his apartment building just outside of Baltimore. He had filed a formal report after an earlier incident where Verombeck, 53, threatened to kill him and a protective order was granted. District Court Judge Devy Patterson Russell later voided the order. A petition on Change.org has garnered nearly 14,000 signatures in an effort to get Russell’s removed from the bench. A Black man was killed by a white neighbor in Maryland after a judge denied his request for protection. He said the neighbor had made death threats.Tyrique Hudson was 22 and a recent college graduate.His alleged killer James Verombeck is in custody and charged with murder. pic.twitter.com/q3YXZiQpjE— AJ+ (@ajplus) April 26, 2019“I feel like they’ve failed my son,” Hudson’s mother, Tonya Burch told CBS Baltimore on Thursday April 18.“They failed me. He had a bright and promising future.”Hudson had moved to Maryland last summer to begin his promising career as a software engineer after graduating early. He had recently begun working for Northrop Grumman. On the day he was killed he was preparing to move into a new building because he feared for his life.Russell has been placed on temporary assignment as the Maryland Court of Appeals decides if she should face suspension for her actions. According to the Capital Gazette, the Commission on Judicial Disabilities suggested Russell be suspended for six months, saying she violated state law and failed to keep up with administrative work. The Baltimore Sun has reported that she has also been accused of screaming at other judges, pushing a staffer and neglecting more than 100 search warrants.Verombeck was arrested after a 10-hour standoff with SWAT and has been charged with first-degree murder.SEE ALSO:Everything We Know About Suspected White Supremacist Accused Of Burning Down Black ChurchesJudge OKs Release Of Accused Domestic Terrorist Who Allegedly Wanted To Kill Cory Booker And Kamal Harris Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored North Carolina A&T University , Tyrique Hudson Tensions High As Alt-Right Activist Richard Spencer Visits U. Florida Campus center_img Following the killing of an HBCU graduate at the hands of his white neighbor, it was revealed the victim had previously tried to prevent his own death. Now thousands were calling for the removal of the judge who denied a protective order to Tyrique Hudson, who was shot and killed by James Verombeck in Maryland on April 15. More By Megan Sims Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago People attend a candlelight vigil tonight at the Colonial Square Apartments in Glen Burnie for Tyrique Hudson, who was killed at the complex. pic.twitter.com/ib38eTzB4C— Capital Gazette (@capgaznews) April 23, 2019The Capital Gazette reported that Hudson wrote that after he took the trash out Feb. 16 and was walking up the stairwell, Verombeck said “you knew this day was coming” before giving him a “death gesture” by sliding his thumb across his throat. Russell denied the protective order claiming Hudson did not “meet the burden of proof” as this was just one incident and not a pattern of behavior. Yet the petition shows this was not Verombeck’s first run-in with protective orders.According to the online petition, electronic records show that Verombeck was arrested in 2010 for violating a protective order. In 2009 a protective order was issued regarding domestic violence and in 1996, he was charged with reckless endangerment, concealing a deadly weapon, disorderly conduct in a public place and having an unregistered rifle or shotgun. While the other charges were dropped, he was found guilty on the latter charge. White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversitylast_img read more

Sea otter archaeology reveals the most smashing rocks

first_imgSea otter archaeology reveals the most smashing rocks Over 10 years of observations, the team identified a so-called “otter signature.” Rocks used as tools had points and ridges that were lighter in color than the rest of the rock. Next, the researchers examined 421 additional rocks in the area and found that 77 were being used to break open shellfish, they report today in Scientific Reports. Shattered mussel shells littering the rocks nearby corroborated the findings, showing telltale breakages that matched the otters’ blunt force modus operandi.With their distinctive patterns, the stones could tell scientists when sea otters started to use tools. The researchers say understanding how long this behavior has been around and how it spread through populations could also help illuminate the broader question of how tool use in other mammals—including humans—evolved. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email By Alex FoxMar. 14, 2019 , 10:00 AM Sea otters—the only marine mammals known to use stone tools—eat on the go by cracking open mussels, sea urchins, and abalone with rocks, using their furry chests as anvils. Now, a new study shows that, by borrowing techniques from archaeology, marine biologists can pick out otter “utensils” from other rocks.Many primates have also been shown to use stone tools. Recently, researchers have blended biology and archaeology to identify patterns of wear on such tools used by apes and monkeys—dating some as far back as 700 years. The findings made researchers wonder whether such methods could also be used on sea otters.Many sea otter rocks get discarded to the sea floor, but some turn up on beaches, where the otters bang their shelled prey against boulders protruding from the sea. One such place, an estuary in central California called Bennett Slough, offered researchers an opportunity to examine the otters’ feeding behavior—and the rocks they dropped after smashing up dinner.last_img read more

Suspect arrested tased during apparent robbery

first_imgStephen Parker         At 10 a.m. on Sunday, April 28, a Holbrook Police Officer on patrol drove by a residence in the 100 block of East Florida Street and saw a black Honda parked in front ofSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad May 8, 2019center_img Suspect arrested, tased during apparent robberylast_img

CM Sisodia granted bail in case of defamation

first_imgNew Delhi | Published: July 17, 2019 2:49:30 am Related News Post Comment(s) Visiting rape victim, CM Arvind Kejriwal stresses on need for death penalty Delhi CM, Sisodia granted bail in case of defamation Deputy CM Manish Sisodia and CM Arvind Kejriwal (File/PTI Photo/Ravi Choudhary)A Delhi court Tuesday granted bail to Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal and his deputy Manish Sisodia in a defamation case filed by BJP leader Vijender Gupta. The CM and Sisodia appeared before the court of Additional Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Samar Vishal, who granted relief on a personal bond of Rs 10,000.Gupta, in his complaint, alleged that Kejriwal had blamed the BJP for an assault on him during a road show in West Delhi.Gupta submitted a tweet by Sisodia, wherein the deputy CM alluded to a conspiracy to kill Kejriwal. He told the court that on the same day, “Kejriwal also tweeted that the BJP wants to get him killed, and tagged the aforesaid tweet of Sisodia with his tweet”. Delhi: Court summons CM Arvind Kejriwal in defamation case Inside Delhi govt school with 210 CCTVs, principal hopes project will help, some students not so sure Advertisinglast_img read more

Highest in three years BEST sells 25 lakh single journey tickets on

first_img Related News By Express News Service |Mumbai | Published: July 17, 2019 3:49:17 am Mumbai: BEST’s salary bill will go up by 33% if unions’ demands are accepted On July 9, the BEST had implemented the new fares. According to the new fare of BEST buses, the minimum fare for a distance of 5 km was reduced to Rs 5 from Rs 8.According to data provided by the BEST, on July 12, ticket sales reached 24.99 lakh without counting pass holders.A senior BEST official said there were nearly four to five lakh pass holders who travelled by BEST buses. ‘Highest in three years’: BEST sells 25 lakh single journey tickets on July 15 On July 9, the BEST slashed its fare in a bid to increase ridership, which had been on the decline over the years. (Express Photo by Amit Chakravarty)ITS HIGHEST in three years, the Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport (BEST) sold 25 lakh single journey tickets in one day on Monday. Within a week since the reduced minimum fare of Rs 5 was introduced, the ridership has increased by 50 per cent, excluding those who hold passes. Post Comment(s) Advertising Mumbai: BEST minimum fare of Rs 5 to kick in today Mayor announces Rs 100-crore aid each month for cash-strapped BEST On Monday, the ridership recorded was the highest in close to three years as it sold over 25 lakh single journey tickets. Officials said they had also seen an increase in the number of pass holders but had not measured the increase yet.Monday’s ticket sales were 50.4 per cent higher than what the transport undertaking sold on July 8, the last day before the revised fares were implemented.On July 9, the BEST slashed its fare in a bid to increase ridership, which had been on the decline over the years.Before the fare revision, the daily average passenger traffic was around 25 lakh, which included pass holders.Officials said they estimated over 32 lakh passengers to have taken the bus on Monday. Advertisinglast_img read more

Clashes break out as Hong Kong protesters escalate fight in suburbs

first_imghong kong, hong kong protests, china, extradition bill, carrie lam, communist party, protesters, police, world news, indian express news Millions have taken to the streets in the past month in some of the largest and most violent protests in decades over an extradition bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party. (AP Photo)Protesters marched in sweltering heat of about 32 degrees Celsius (89.6°F) in Sha Tin, a town between Hong Kong island and the border with China, extending the demonstrations outward from the heart of the financial centre into surrounding districts.“These days there is really no trust of China, and so the protesters come out,” said Jennie Kwan, 73.“Didn’t they promise 50 years, no change? And yet we’ve all seen the changes. I myself am already 70-something years old. What do I know about politics? But politics comes to you.”Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” formula that guarantees its people freedoms for 50 years that are not enjoyed in mainland China, including the liberty to protest and an independent judiciary. Related News More Explained Hong Kong protesters, police clash as demonstrations target Chinese traders One placard featured a picture of Chinese leader Xi Jinping with the words: “Extradite to China, disappear forever.”hong kong, hong kong protests, china, extradition bill, carrie lam, communist party, protesters, police, us, donald trump, world news, indian express news Riot policemen use shields to protect themselves from things thrown by protesters outside a shopping mall in Sha Tin District in Hong Kong. (AP Photo)Chants of “Carrie Lam go to hell!” rang through the crowd, gathered well away from the island heart of the financial centre which has witnessed the largest and most violent demonstrations over the past month.Organisers said around 115,000 attended Sunday’s rally. Police put the number at 28,000 at its peak.Protesters span generations Police chief Stephen Lo said 10 officers were injured and taken to hospital during clashes, including one who had a segment of his finger bitten off by a protester.More than 40 people were arrested for charges including assaulting police and illegal assembly, he added.The bill has stirred outrage across broad sections of Hong Kong society amid concerns it would threaten the much-cherished rule of law that underpins the city’s international financial status. Young, elderly and families joined the latest protest.The protests have caused the former British colony’s biggest political crisis since its handover to China. Demonstrators stormed the Legislative Council building on July 1 and ransacked it.“I never missed a march so far since June,” said a 69-year-old man who gave only his surname, Chen.“I support the youngsters, they have done something we haven’t done. There is nothing we can do to help them, but come out and march to show our appreciation and support.”Protesters are also demanding that Lam step down, the withdrawal of the word “riot” to describe demonstrations, the unconditional release of those arrested and an independent investigation into complaints of police brutality.Police have condemned what they describe as “violent protesters” and stressed that officers will investigate all illegal acts.One woman, in her mid-50s, said protesters had harassed her after she tried to defend the police, whom activists described as “dogs”.“It’s verbal violence,” said the woman, who gave her name only as Catherine. “People just surrounded me and shouted rude language and that makes me feel I am living in fear.”Mass protests over the bill since June have morphed into demonstrations over democracy and broader grievances in society.On Saturday, a largely peaceful demonstration in a town close to the Chinese border turned violent as protesters hurled umbrellas and hardhats at police, who retaliated by swinging batons and firing pepper spray.The government condemned violence during Saturday’s protests against so-called “parallel traders” from the mainland who buy goods in bulk in Hong Kong to carry into China for profit.It said that during the last 18 months it had arrested 126 mainland visitors suspected of infringing the terms of their stay by engaging in parallel trading, and barred about 5,000 mainland Chinese also suspected of involvement.Earlier on Sunday, hundreds of journalists joined a silent march to demand better treatment from police at protests. hong kong, hong kong protests, china, extradition bill, carrie lam, communist party, protesters, police, world news, indian express news Protesters scuffle with policemen inside a shopping mall in Sha Tin District in Hong Kong. (AP Photo)Tens of thousands rallied in a large Hong Kong suburb on Sunday, driven by abiding anger at the government’s handling of an extradition bill that has revived fears of China tightening its grip over the former British colony and eroding its freedoms. Advertising Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Advertising Beijing denies interfering in Hong Kong affairs, but many residents worry about what they see as an erosion of those freedoms and a relentless march toward mainland control.Hong Kong’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, has said the extradition bill is “dead”, but opponents say they will settle for nothing short of its formal withdrawal.Some protesters on Sunday waved banners appealing to US President Donald Trump to “Please liberate Hong Kong” and “Defend our Constitution”. Such scenes are certain to rile Beijing, which has been angered by criticism from Washington and London over the controversial bill.Others waved British and American flags, while banners calling for Hong Kong’s independence billowed in the sultry breeze from makeshift flagpoles. Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed A police statement said that while there was room for improvement in coordination between officers and the media, the police respected press freedom and the media’s right to report. Advertising ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict By Reuters |Hong Kong | Published: July 15, 2019 9:05:15 am Hong Kong protests augur murky outlook for financial hub Clashes broke out as protesters hurled umbrellas and plastic bottles at police who retaliated by firing pepper spray amid chaotic scenes inside a shopping mall that houses some of the world’s biggest luxury brands.Most of the demonstrators dispersed shortly afterward as a small group sang the Christian hymn “Sing Hallelujah to the Lord”, which has emerged as the unlikely anthem of the protests.Millions have taken to the streets in the past month in some of the largest and most violent protests in decades over an extradition bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party. Hong Kong tourism, hotel occupancy falls as protests drag on Best Of Express Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Russians Pose as Americans to Steal Data on Social Media

first_imgAmericans were targeted on social media by Russian agents on a mission to harvest personal information, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.The agents pretended to work for organizations promoting African-American businesses as a ruse to obtain personal information from black business owners during the 2016 presidential election campaign, according to the report.Using names like “BlackMattersUS” and “Black4Black,” the agents set up hundreds of accounts on Facebook and Instagram, the WSJ said.As part of its efforts to address the abuse of its platform during the election, Facebook introduced a tool that would enable its members to determine if they had contact with Russian propaganda during that period. The tool doesn’t address the problem of Kremlin agents masquerading as Americans, however.Facebook did not respond to our request to comment for this story. Credible news outlets should be given some kind of distinctive authentication, Naum also recommended.Social media companies have certain “verified” users, but that appears to be inadequate. “Lots of bad guys are verified,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Twitter and Facebook could also publish trending information about bots and bad information so users can see what’s trending that is legit and what’s trending that is junk,” Naum suggested.What can consumers do to protect themselves?Users should “approach social media with the same skepticism that they should be approaching email and scams,” Risk Based Security’s Martin advised.”Someone offering you 100 million dollars is suspect, of course,” he said.”Someone that seems to have a ‘magic bullet’ showing a political figure is the next devil? Think about it more critically than you might otherwise,” Martin cautioned. “Does the post have any evidence to back it up? Or is it just a compelling picture, that may have been doctored, and a catchy one-liner that invokes emotional responses?” Defeating America Without Bullets Target of Opportunity The Journal story came on the heels of President Donald Trump’s Tuesday announcement that his administration was doing a “very, very deep” study of election meddling and would make “very strong” recommendations about the 2018 elections.However, Adm. Michael Rogers, chief of the U.S. Cyber Command and head of the National Security Agency, last week told the Senate Armed Services Committee that the White House had not directed him to take any actions to counter potential Russian meddling in the 2018 elections.”The impact of social media is very real,” said Ajay K. Gupta, program chair for computer networks and cybersecurity at the University of Maryland.”The lack of real attribution for social media content means that elections are being impacted by people who we don’t know who they are,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Russians have said since the beginning of the Cold War they would be able to defeat America without firing a single bullet,” Gupta added. “They couldn’t do that as the U.S.S.R., but social media has given them another opportunity to try that.” What’s a Social Network to Do?center_img The latest revelation about Russian activity on social media during the elections lends credence to the idea that the Kremlin’s goal is not to swing elections one way or another, but to weaken America’s form of government.One in four voters were considering staying away from the polls due to cybersecurity fears, according to a survey Carbon Black conducted last year, for example. If accurate, that could put the number who would not vote for that reason in the neighborhood of 55 million.”This blended campaign of human intelligence and signals intelligence is dangerous for democracy,” said Tom Kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer at Carbon Black.Russia is into the long game, noted Tellagraff CEO Mark Graff.”Hillary Clinton was a target of opportunity for the Russians in the 2016 election,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Their strategic goal was not to elect Donald Trump. The strategic goal was to disrupt American society, undermine our feelings of unity, undermine our faith in democracy,” Graff maintained. “They’ve been trying to do that for over 50 years — and now what they can do, using social media, is do it from the comfort of government buildings inside Russia.” Better Authentication Both Twitter and Facebook have made efforts to counter nation-state backed exploitation of their platforms, but the consensus is that more can be done.”They must dynamically verify the identities of their users and filter illicit and inflammatory content,” Carbon Black’s Kellermann told TechNewsWorld.”Facebook and Twitter are seemingly just learning how to combat this, and they both appear to be very late to the game,” observed Brian Martin, director of vulnerability intelligence at Risk Based Security.The social networks could deploy a number of measures, he told TechNewsWorld, ranging from monitoring the IP addresses of suspect accounts to refining their analyses of the language in posts, looking for key indicators of actors who don’t speak English as their first language.Users should have the option to flag suspected bots, so the social media companies could investigate and weed out bad actors, said Sherban Naum, senior vice president for corporate strategy and technology at Bromium. John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.last_img read more

Certain test strips used with homeuse devices may provide inaccurate results warns

first_img Source:https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm624904.htm Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 2 2018The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today is warning patients and doctors, who use at-home or in-the-office medical devices to monitor levels of the blood thinner, warfarin, that certain test strips used with the devices may provide inaccurate results and should not be relied upon to adjust the drug dosage. Roche Diagnostics issued a voluntary recall of certain test strip lots used with its CoaguChek test meter devices. The recall involves more than 1.1 million packages of CoaguChek XS PT Test Strips that were distributed nationwide from Jan. 12, 2018 to Oct. 29, 2018. Today, the FDA announced this action as a Class I recall, the most serious type of recall, which means use of these devices may cause serious injuries or death.The FDA is warning patients and health care professionals that they should not rely on these test meter devices to monitor warfarin levels if they’re using test strips affected by the recall. Instead, they should have blood drawn from a vein and have their levels measured by a laboratory test or use an alternative meter device.”These strips are widely used and we are working diligently to warn health care providers and the public about the dangers associated with this recall. Using faulty strips can lead to serious errors in medication dosage that could cause serious harm or death in some patients,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “We are also working with the company on the swift removal of the recalled strips and to ensure the new corrected strips are distributed to patients and health care providers as quickly as possible.”Millions of Americans take the blood thinner warfarin (also known by the brand names Coumadin and Jantoven) to prevent and treat blood clots. The drug may be prescribed for patients with certain types of irregular heartbeats, blood clots in the legs or lungs, or certain medical device implants such as artificial heart valves. Achieving the correct warfarin dosage is crucial, and patients need regular monitoring to test how long it takes their blood to clot. The response is measured by a blood test to check the International Normalized Ratio, or INR. This test can be performed by an accredited laboratory on blood drawn from a vein or with a fingerstick blood draw using an INR test meter at home or in a doctor’s office.The FDA’s warning concerning the CoaguChek XS PT Test Strips is based on medical device reports submitted by Roche Diagnostics to the agency indicating that the test strips may provide results that are higher than the actual INR. As a result of incorrect INR results, some patients may be prescribed an insufficient warfarin dose or instructed to interrupt warfarin use, which may increase the risk for dangerous blood clots. Approximately 90 medical device reports and two serious patient injuries involving strokes were reported to the FDA.Related StoriesScientists turn type A blood into universal type O, potentially doubling blood transfusion stocksBlood stem cell breakthrough could spare some patients from side effects of cancer treatmentsRadiometer’s ABL9 blood gas analyzer awarded Red Dot Design AwardIncorrect INR results are of particular concern for individuals at an increased risk of blood clots including those with mechanical heart valves, atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat) who are at a high risk of stroke, or those who had a recent blood clot. It is important to note that problems with the CoaguChek XS PT test strips are not likely to be evident to the patient.Roche Diagnostics attributes the cause of the problem to a recent re-calibration of the test strips to a different international standard that occurred earlier this year. They plan to provide new batches of re-calibrated test strips, based on the previous international standard, to their customers by the end of November; the FDA reviewed validation data submitted by the company for these recalibrated strips. The test strips are used with the CoaguChek XS plus, CoaguChek XS Pro, CoaguChek XS professional, CoaguChek XS PST and CoaguChek Vantus test meter devices.Patients who are using CoaguChek meters should contact their health care provider to get information about alternative test methods and to address questions regarding their individual testing schedule. Patients should also contact their patient self-testing service providers to find out when they will be getting their corrected test strips. Health care providers and patients may contact Roche Diagnostics to learn more details about the recall.All health care providers, patients and caregivers, are strongly encouraged to voluntarily report INR test meter problems directly to the FDA through MedWatch, the FDA’s voluntary reporting program. Problems should be reported whenever one suspects that there may be an issue with an INR test meter such as a malfunction or incorrect result, or that the meter caused or contributed to a serious injury or death.The FDA is committed to continuing to communicate publicly on this issue and will provide updates related to this recall when available.last_img read more

Targeting antidiuretic hormone vasopressin shows promise for autism

first_imgFurther Reading Image Credit: Zahraa Saleh / Shutterstock Intranasal vasopressin improves social deficits in children with autismThe first study was conducted on children with autism. Karen Parker, a behavioural scientist at Stanford University, explains that the study of the effects hormone on lab voles was one of her earlier research work. Now she works as the director of the university’s Social Neurosciences Research Program and recruited human children with autism for the study. The study results appeared in the latest issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine this week (1st May 2019). The study was titled, “A randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial shows that intranasal vasopressin improves social deficits in children with autism”.The team writes that they examined the vasopressin levels in the children with autism spectrum disorder. They noted that these children have less amount of vasopressin in their spinal fluid compared to children who were not on the spectrum. They also noted that the symptom severity rose with lower levels of vasopressin. This included severe language and speech difficulties and increase sensitivity, poor IQ and cognitive skills etc.As a next step, Parker and her colleagues conducted a double blinded randomized controlled trial including 30 children with ASD aged between 6 and 12 years. The children were given a nasal spray containing either vasopressin (17 children) or placebo (13 children) over a period of four weeks.Results revealed that children with ASD who were given vasopressin nasal spray had significantly improved social skills and had little or no side effects due to the drug. They noted that the children improved on social communication and also improved on assessment of facial emotions of other people. They could better guess the thinking and feelings of other people. Parents as well as doctors assessing the children reported these improvements. “The parents saw improvement, the clinicians saw improvement, and the children’s performance on lab tests also improved with vasopressin compared to placebo,” Parker said. What is Autism? Autism Causes Autism Mechanism Autism Classification Autism Screening Autism Management Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Autism The Reward System and Autism Autism and Junk DNA Picky Eating and Autism: Tips & Advicecenter_img By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDMay 2 2019Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with no known drug treatment up until now. Researchers have finally found tweaking certain hormones could help patients with autism. There were two independent clinical trials including children and adults with autism that altered the effects of the hormone vasopressin and to assess the effects on social functioning.Researchers explain the vasopressin is an important hormone in the body that helps to maintain and regulate the kidney functions and blood pressure. Animal studies in the labs revealed that vasopressin has more complex actions in the brains. The hormone can affect social behaviours of the lab animals as well as their bonding with their mates, the researchers noted. There are studies showing the effects of administering vasopressin in healthy humans as well as in humans with dementia and other cognitive problems. The hormone when administered leads to improvement in memory and social skills of the humans, researchers have found. Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University and co-author of the study said, “Autism is a very heterogeneous disorder. It may be possible, with autism, to see abnormalities that relate to either too much vasopressin or too little.”Parker in one of her statements said, “This is a pilot trial, so it’s important to acknowledge that. But there were significant improvements in kids on vasopressin. And we saw this convergent evidence on parent ratings, clinician evaluations, and laboratory tests of children’s performance.” She added that large trials with more number of children are necessary to prove the efficacy of the hormonal nasal spray in showing improvement. She explained that in her trial there were only 5 girls on ASD since boys were more commonly diagnosed with ASD than girls. She said that larger trials with equal gender representation may be needed to see if there was any gender specific efficacy of the drug.Vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist shows improved adaptive behaviors in men with autism spectrum disorderResearchers at Roche a Swiss-based pharmaceutical company also conducted a double-blinded, randomized, and controlled trial among adult men on the autism spectrum. The study results appeared in the latest issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine this week (1st May 2019). Senior researcher Dr. Paulo Fontoura senior vice president of neuroscience and rare diseases clinical development at Roche Pharmaceuticals led the study titled, “A phase 2 clinical trial of a vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist shows improved adaptive behaviors in men with autism spectrum disorder.”For their study the team administered an experimental drug balovaptan or placebo to 223 men with autism. Various doses of the experimental drug was administered (1.5, 4 or 10 milligrams of balovaptan). The mechanism by which the drug acts is by blocking one type of cell receptors in the brain that connects with vasopressin. Fontoura said in a statement that balovaptan has the potential “to improve the core characteristics of social interaction and communications in adults with ASD.” The drug therapy was administered for 12 weeks. Social skills and behaviour in this study as well was measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale.The results of the study showed that there was no significant improvement in the social skills of the men with the drug compared to placebo. The assessment of improvement was made by the primary care givers of the patients. One set of assessment questionnaires were given to patients directly to assess their perception of improvement in the social skills. Results revealed that self-reported benefits in social skills and communication was noted with second-highest and highest doses of the experimental drug.Expert speakThese two sets of researchers had not collaborated on their studies and the studies were independent. Experts have suggested that although one of the trials did not show an outright success, there is a possibility in exploring vasopressin in autism. As a next step, Parker and her team is working on recruiting a large group of children (100 children) on the spectrum to assess the efficacy and safety of their nasal spray. Similarly Roche is also planning a second set of trials with children on the spectrum aged 5 to 17 years. One of the studies is a Phase II trial among children and adolescents while the other phase III trial is among adults.Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioural pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center in New Hyde Park, was sceptical about the efficacy of vasopressin in autism. He said in a statement, “These two studies, taken together, suggest that treatments to increase vasopressin levels in the brain may be helpful for some patients with ASD. However, much more research is needed in terms of the long-term benefits and safety of this type of treatment.” He warned that vasopressin is approved as an antidiuretic to be prescribed by a physician. The hype caused by these studies may tempt patients to use the medication for autism. He said, “I think families and physicians need to be cautious in using this medication on the basis of a single short-term study.” “Given that there are very few if any good medication options for the treatment of ASD, I am sure there will be great interest in this novel treatment approach. That said, I think much more research is needed before we can feel comfortable recommending vasopressin as a safe and effective treatment for one of the core deficits in children with ASD,” he said.Kevin Pelphrey, an autism researcher at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, spoke about the conflicting results saying, “I’ve never seen this before.” He called the results exciting though adding that the role of vasopressin in the brain is to be studied with renewed interest.Angela Sirigu, neuroscientist at CNRS, in Bron France, is also investigating neurohormones for the management of autism. She called the results exciting.Eric Hollander, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, in his statement regarding the studies aid, “These two studies provide important information that the vasopressin or vasopressin and oxytocin systems are important in social communication. Different agents affecting these systems may ultimately be helpful in terms of new treatments for autism.”Lawrence Scahill, director of clinical trials at the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta also warned about misinterpreting the results of these studies. He said, “Both of these studies suggest that the mechanism is worth further study. But I think we want to be careful not to overinterpret the findings.”Elizabeth Hammock, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Florida State University in Tallahasse added that both the studies looked at two approaches of using vasopressin. She said, “They’re really divergent approaches to targeting the vasopressin system. And we don’t know for sure how either is working.”last_img read more